Research News Highlight

‘Drawn-on-Skin’ Electronics Offer Breakthrough in Wearable Monitors

Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, led a team reporting a new form of electronics known as “drawn-on-skin electronics,” which allows multifunctional sensors and circuits to be drawn on the skin with an ink pen.

A team of researchers led by Dr. Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston, has developed a new form of electronics known as “drawn-on-skin electronics,” allowing multifunctional sensors and circuits to be drawn on the skin with an ink pen.

If Cement Could Talk - Startup based on UH Technology to make world safer

Ody De La Paz, co-founder and CEO of Sensytec.

Deadly explosions on offshore oil platforms. Collapsing bridges. Gaping potholes large enough to swallow a car.

Cement is the most widely used construction material in the world, but there hasn’t been an easy-to-use and reliable way to ensure its structural integrity. A revolutionary technology from a lab at the University of Houston is changing that and could help to lower the risks. 

A Roadmap to Better Multivalent Batteries

Researchers report that while magnesium and other multivalent metals show promise for high-density energy storage, but a number of obstacles remain. Photo: Getty Images.

Lithium-ion batteries are recognized for their high energy density in everything from mobile phones to laptop computers and electric vehicles, but as the need for grid-scale energy storage and other applications becomes more pressing, researchers have sought less expensive and more readily available alternatives to lithium.

Mónico's work pulls order from chaos

Dr. Rodolfo Ostilla Mónico

For Dr. Rodolfo Ostilla Mónico, an assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering since Fall 2017, much of his work the past decade on turbulence has centered around a big question – can we find order in the chaos?

UH and Harvard Researchers Join Forces For Usher Syndrome Research

Muna Naash, John S. Dunn Endowed Professor with joint appointments at the UH Cullen College of Engineering and the UH College of Optometry.

NIH-funded project to explore whether gene therapy can correct genetic deafness

A world-renowned authority on genetic mutations associated with hereditary retinal disorders from the University of Houston is working with a researcher from Harvard Medical School specializing in the diseases and disorders of the ear, nose and throat (ENT) to advance research involving gene therapy options that could one day expand treatment of patients suffering from Usher syndrome.

UH Engineer Honored For Work in Crystal Engineering

Jeffrey Rimer, Abraham E. Dukler Professor of Chemical Engineering at UH, has received the 2020 Edith and Peter O’Donnell Award in Engineering from The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas

TAMEST Awards Recognize Texas’ Most Promising Researchers

 

An engineer from the University of Houston has received the state’s top honor in engineering for his pioneering discoveries about how crystals form and how they can be dissolved.

Under the Lens: Link Between Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration are both genetic disorders that can cause loss of vision and neither has a cure.

UH Research Team Examines Eye Disease with $2.5 Million Award

 

Four words you never want to hear from the eye doctor are retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. Both are genetic disorders that can cause loss of vision and neither has a cure. A team of biomedical researchers at the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering is now tackling both eye diseases by exploring a protein in the retina that links them: peripherin2 (prph2).

New Hybrid Device Can Both Capture and Store Solar Energy

Researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new device that can both efficiently harvest solar energy and store it until it is needed, suggesting a way to deploy solar energy around-the-clock. Photo: Pexels

Device Offers a New Avenue for Capitalizing on Abundant Solar Energy

 

Researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new device that can both efficiently capture solar energy and store it until it is needed, offering promise for applications ranging from power generation to distillation and desalination.

A Collaboration of Satellites and Villages: UH Professor Continues Work With NASA and Mekong River Stakeholders To Address Flooding and Other Critical Issues

Hyongki Lee, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, is working on his second NASA SERVIR project.

Hyongki Lee, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, has a lot of experience using data collected by Earth-observing technologies (such as satellites)  for solving water management issues on Earth. 

With his latest grant, Lee is diving deeper into addressing critical concerns such as land subsidence, flood forecasting and groundwater management in the Mekong region of Southeast Asia.

UH Engineer’s Research on Adaptive Machine Learning Wins NSF Award

Adaptive machine has potential application in a number of different fields, including medical imaging, computer vision, self-driving cars, and speech recognition.

Research has broad implications for health care, self-driving cars and more.

 

Imagine cruising down a highway in your self-driving car. Its operating system relies on algorithms based on data collected during dry driving conditions. But what happens when the car has to navigate through high winds, hard rain and street flooding?

Cullen College Researchers A Big Part of EMBC 2019

UH Cullen College Professor Rose Faghih with her students at the 2019 EMBC in Germany.

Featured UH Research Marries Health Care and Engineering

 

Rose Faghih, assistant professor, and several other UH Cullen College of Engineering faculty and students were an integral part of the 2019 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference held in Berlin, Germany. The theme was “Biomedical engineering ranging from wellness to intensive care.”

Pages