Research Breakthrough

Tapping the Brain to Boost Stroke Rehabilitation

A clinical trial found that stroke survivors gained clinically significant arm movement and control by using an external robotic device powered by the patients’ own brains.
Clinical Trial Suggests Brain-Machine Interface Coupled with Robot Offers Increased Benefits for Stroke Survivors

Stroke survivors who had ceased to benefit from conventional rehabilitation gained clinically significant arm movement and control by using an external robotic device powered by the patients’ own brains.

A Safer, Less Expensive and Fast Charging Aqueous Battery

Xiaonan Shan, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, said the discovery offers promise for energy storage and other applications, including electric vehicles.

Lithium-ion batteries are critical for modern life, from powering our laptops and cell phones to those new holiday toys. But there is a safety risk – the batteries can catch fire.

Zinc-based aqueous batteries avoid the fire hazard by using a water-based electrolyte instead of the conventional chemical solvent. However, uncontrolled dendrite growth limits their ability to provide the high performance and long life needed for practical applications.

Discoveries Highlight New Possibilities for Magnesium Batteries

Researchers from the University of Houston and the Toyota Research Institute of North America have reported a breakthrough in the development of magnesium batteries, allowing them to deliver a power density comparable to that of lithium-ion batteries.

New cathode, electrolyte allow high-power battery previously considered impossible

Magnesium batteries have long been considered a potentially safer and less expensive alternative to lithium-ion batteries, but previous versions have been severely limited in the power they delivered.

New Technology Allows More Precise View of the Smallest Nanoparticles

Wei-Chuan Shih, professor of electrical and computer engineering at UH, is the corresponding author for a paper about a new optical imaging technology for nanoscale objects, relying upon unscattered light to detect nanoparticles as small as 25 nanometers in diameter.

Imaging Technology Offers Advantages for Diagnostics, Other Uses

Current state-of-the-art techniques have clear limitations when it comes to imaging the smallest nanoparticles, making it difficult for researchers to study viruses and other structures at the molecular level.

UH, Houston Methodist using AI to identify breast cancer

Dr. Hien Van Nguyen, an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering, has received a grant to use AI with breast cancer diagnoses.

Dr. Hien Van Nguyen, an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering, received an R01 sub-award of $319,285 for his grant, “Convergent AI for Precise Breast Cancer Risk Assessment,” from the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health.

A Roadmap to Better Multivalent Batteries

Researchers report that while magnesium and other multivalent metals show promise for high-density energy storage, but a number of obstacles remain. Photo: Getty Images.

Lithium-ion batteries are recognized for their high energy density in everything from mobile phones to laptop computers and electric vehicles, but as the need for grid-scale energy storage and other applications becomes more pressing, researchers have sought less expensive and more readily available alternatives to lithium.

New $1M Hardware Project Would Boost 5G Networks

Harish Krishnamoorthy, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at UH, is creating a roadmap to boost the development of 5G networks.

There are big advantages to 5G networks. In addition to faster speeds, 5G offers greater bandwidth and network capacity, paving the way for a future of driverless cars, connected devices and more high-definition connections for virtual meetings and telemedicine. But the rollout in the United States and elsewhere has been stymied by gaps in available technology that could operate at the high frequencies required by 5G.

Cullen College Researchers A Big Part of EMBC 2019

UH Cullen College Professor Rose Faghih with her students at the 2019 EMBC in Germany.

Featured UH Research Marries Health Care and Engineering

 

Rose Faghih, assistant professor, and several other UH Cullen College of Engineering faculty and students were an integral part of the 2019 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference held in Berlin, Germany. The theme was “Biomedical engineering ranging from wellness to intensive care.”

UH Engineers Test Biodegradable Self-Guided Reconnaissance Devices

UH ECE student Jarrett Lonsford works on the electronics for a sensing drift node in Dr. Aaron Becker's lab on Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019.

Researchers share video of their Advanced Naval Technology Exercise

 

Discretion is an integral part of covert reconnaissance missions. With that in mind, a team of UH Cullen College of Engineering researchers are working on a $1 million project to create self-guided biodegradable containers of sensors to map coastlines and the bottom of the ocean. 

UH Engineer Leads Team Creating Point-of-Care Test for Prostate Cancer

Unlike the pregnancy test, which uses the color change in the test line as a readout, the new tool will use ultrasensitive sensing of magnetic nanoparticles to detect trace amounts of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in a patient’s blood.

Improving Outcomes for Prostate Cancer Patients

 

A team of researchers from the University of Houston and the University of Pennsylvania are working to bring a new biosensor for detecting the recurrence of prostate cancer to the doctor’s office.

UH Engineer Offers Proposals to Improve Nation’s Electric Grid

UH Engineer Offers Proposals to Improve Nation's Electric Grid. Photo: Getty Images

Xingpeng Li Submitted Two Winning Proposals to DOE Competition

 

Balancing electricity supply and demand is challenging, and the prospect of blackouts carries a substantial economic risk. An engineer with the University of Houston is working on solutions.

Researchers Report High Performance Solid-State Sodium-Ion Battery

ORGANIC CATHODE OFFERS MORE RELIABLE CONTACT WITH ELECTROLYTE, A KEY TO STABILITY

 

Solid-state sodium-ion batteries are far safer than conventional lithium-ion batteries, which pose a risk of fire and explosions, but their performance has been too weak to offset the safety advantages. Researchers Friday reported developing an organic cathode that dramatically improves both stability and energy density.

Imaging Technology Will Offer New Clues to Embryonic Development

Researchers from the University of Houston and Baylor College of Medicine are developing a new technology to allow simultaneous imaging of both embryonic structural development and the molecular underpinnings that occur in the developing circulatory system.

Better Understanding Could Lead to New Prevention and Treatment for Birth Defects

 

Soon after conception, an embryo’s circulatory system connects to that of its mother. Complications that occur at this critical time can result in miscarriage or birth defects with long-term chronic conditions. Unfortunately, limitations in imaging technologies prevent researchers from fully understanding the cellular-level events leading up to this crucial point.

Researchers Report New Light-Activated Micro Pump

Researchers have announced the discovery of a laser-driven photoacoustic microfluidic pump, capable of moving fluids in any direction without moving parts or electrical contacts.

Pump Works Without Moving Parts, Electrical Contacts

 

Even the smallest mechanical pumps have limitations, from the complex microfabrication techniques required to make them to the fact that there are limits on how small they can be. Researchers have announced a potential solution – a laser-driven photoacoustic microfluidic pump, capable of moving fluids in any direction without moving parts or electrical contacts.

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