CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Research News Highlight

Mission: Possible — Mapping Dangerous Terrain

UH researchers are testing prototypes for the project in Brays Bayou.

UH Engineers Focus on Degradable Reconnaissance Vehicles and Evasive Drone Maneuvers

 

Ensuring military forces have up-to-date information about a potentially hostile region offers obvious advantages, but current methods for doing that – especially along shorelines, where underwater mines and other hazards can pose serious risks – all have drawbacks. It is especially difficult if keeping the technology out of enemy hands is a priority.

UH Researchers Win $1M Award to Boost Student Success

Lisette Montemayor, incoming freshman, is part of UH's newest Student Success Program funded by the NSF.

The National Science Foundation awarded a $999,029 grant to a team of University of Houston researchers for a new program aimed at studying the impact of scholarships, engagement and other support on low-income students and their academic success.

UH Engineering Student Wins First Place at 2018 EMI Conference

Mohammad Joshaghani, a Ph.D. student at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, wins top award with research.

Inspired by nature, Ph.D. candidate proposes computational framework to solve life problems

 

Real life problems are often complex and hard to resolve. So Mohammad Sarraf Joshaghani, a third year Ph.D. student at the Cullen College of Engineering, looks to nature, numerical techniques and computers to find possible solutions.

Can Nanoparticles Be Used to Lower Antibiotic Resistance?

Debora Rodrigues, left, and Stacey Louie, both faculty members in the Cullen College of Engineering, are using a reactor built to simulate the intestines of a pig to study ways to combat antibiotic resistance.

UH Engineers Are Testing a Theory with Livestock Microbiome

Antibiotic resistance is one of the world’s most serious threats to public health, forcing the use of medications that are more toxic, more expensive and not always effective. There are several causes, including over-prescription of antibiotics in both humans and in livestock.

Researchers Design ‘Soft’ Robots that Can Move on Their Own

Robots Could be Used in Medicine, Rescue and Defense

 

If Star Wars’ R2-D2 is your idea of a robot, think again. Researchers led by a University of Houston engineer have reported a new class of soft robot, composed of ultrathin sensing, actuating electronics and temperature-sensitive artificial muscle that can adapt to the environment and crawl, similar to the movement of an inchworm or caterpillar.

Researcher Takes New Approach to Antibiotic Tolerance

University of Houston chemical and biomolecular engineering researcher Mehmet Orman is investigating bacterial cells, called persisters, that won’t die when antibiotics hit them.

Wins National Award to Further Research

 

With a perfect score on his research proposal, chemical and biomolecular engineering researcher Mehmet Orman received the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Career Transition Award, meant to help initiate a successful bioengineering career as an independent research scientist. Orman will use the $250,000 prize to investigate cells that are resistant to antibiotics.

Researchers Seek to Improve Quality Control for Nanomanufacturing

Venkat Selvamanickam, MD Anderson Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston

New Monitoring Tool Would Be Able To Detect Imperfections Almost Instantaneously

Researchers from the University of Houston are developing a new quality control tool for continuous nanomanufacturing, a key step in moving nanodevices from the lab to the real world.

“Nanomanufacturing sounds great, but it really has to be scalable,” said Venkat Selvamanickam, MD Anderson Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering. “You have to be able to control the quality.”

Nature Magazine Features UH Professor’s Work to Address Paralysis

Nature features University of Houston Professor Jose Contreras-Vidal, known for his work to improve prostheses using brain-machine interfaces.

About 3.5 million people in America are living with some degree of paralysis related to stroke, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy. Nature magazine this month published an article about scientists developing technological solutions, such as neural prostheses or devices that read brain signals and help restore movement in paralyzed patients.

Battery Expert Powers Up With a Scialog Award

Yan Yao, a University of Houston engineering professor, wins a Scialog award for his work with batteries.

When it comes to batteries, UH engineer Yan Yao never runs out of award-winning ideas.

Yao, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at the UH Cullen College, and his research partners are known for their work to create better, safer and longer lasting batteries in the energy storage field. 

Award Allows Engineers to Pursue Technique for Assessing Systemic Sclerosis

Two professors at the UH Cullen College of Engineering earned a $200,000 Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP) Discovery Award from the U.S. Department of Defense to further explore a quantitative assessment technique for systemic sclerosis (SSc). The autoimmune disorder is characterized by thickening of soft tissues in the body caused by accumulations of collagen. 

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