CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Research News Highlight

Understanding Congenital Heart Defects To Prevent Them

Determining how hearts develop in utero is critical to understanding congenital heart defects.

UH Engineer Using Optical Equipment to Watch Heart Develop

 

To understand cardiovascular failures, the leading cause of birth defect-related deaths in infants, UH professor of biomedical engineering Kirill Larin is teaming up with Baylor College of Medicine professor of cellular and molecular physiology Irina Larina on a chicken and egg hunt.

Establishing Immunotherapy For Pediatric Liver Cancer

One of the most common forms of liver cancer in adolescents is hepatocellular carcinoma in which patient survival rates are under 30 percent. Photo courtesy: GettyImages

T-Cell Editor Creating Powerful Immunotherapy Weapon

 

As part of a $6 million effort to establish new therapies for high-risk pediatric liver cancer, Navin Varadarajan, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the Cullen College of Engineering, will modify T cells to recognize and kill glypican-3, a molecule found in liver cancer cells.

Undergrads From Across the Country Work As UH Engineering Researchers Over Summer

Student researcher presented their work at the 2018 UH REU Poster Session to students and faculty

UH Cullen College’s REU Programs Focus on Materials Science, Neurotechnologies

 

For 10 weeks over the summer, undergraduate students from across the U.S. became bonafide engineering researchers, working alongside some of UH Cullen College’s brightest minds to solve some of the world’s most pressing technical challenges with science and ingenuity.

‘Smart’ Robotic System Could Offer Home-Based Rehabilitation

While early prototypes of robotic rehabilitation systems controlled by the user's own brain required the use of skullcaps embedded with sensors, researchers are developing a simpler version that can be used at home.

Industry Partnership Supports Faster Track to Commercialize Accessible Healthcare

 

Researchers in Houston and elsewhere have shown that robotic systems controlled by the user’s own brain activity can help patients recovering from stroke and other disabling injuries. But the demonstrations have taken place in highly controlled settings, and none of the systems have been approved for use in clinics or patient’s homes.

Beyond Archaeology: NCALM Pursues New Technology, New Projects

Researchers with the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping used the center's lidar-equipped plane to map the permafrost in Antarctica.

Lidar Mapping Has Also Yielded Other Earth Science Discoveries

 

The National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping is best-known for its headline-grabbing work in archeology – the 2016 discovery of previously unknown ruins of a complex Maya settlement in the Guatemalan jungles, undocumented settlements from an ancient civilization in Honduras uncovered in 2012, and detailed mapping of more than a dozen other settlements in Mexico and Central America.

UH Engineer Part of $800K DOE Study Targeting Safer Storage for Nuclear Waste

UH Researcher Working on DOE Project For Safer Storage of Nuclear Waste

Rimer: ‘Understanding Formation Process of Zeolites is Key.’

 

About 20 percent of the electricity produced in the United States of America is generated at nuclear power plants, according to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This means residents in one out of every five U.S. homes turn on their lights, use refrigerators and make toast – among other things – using energy generated by nuclear power plants.

UH Professor Part of National Event on the Interworking of Art and the Brain

Jose Contreras-Vidal, a UH researcher, in discussion with a dancer for his "Brain on Art" research.

Contreras-Vidal seeks to answer what happens in the brain as people create and enjoy art

 

Bringing together scientific research and artistic inquiry is a serious mission for the D.C. Art Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER). It offers monthly conversations about different interdisciplinary topics with invited speakers from all over America.

Stool Proteins to Predict Inflammatory Bowel Disease

At left, Chandra Mohan, Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen Endowed Professor of biomedical engineering, with graduate student Sanam Soomro

Method Less Invasive, Less Expensive than Colonoscopy

 

University of Houston researcher Chandra Mohan is set to make a breakthrough in predicting and monitoring inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). With $347,490 from the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America, he and IBD expert Subra Kugathasan, a gastroenterologist at Emory University, are examining stool protein biomarkers that indicate the disease.

Mission: Possible — Mapping Dangerous Terrain

UH researchers are testing prototypes for the project in Brays Bayou.

UH Engineers Focus on Degradable Reconnaissance Vehicles and Evasive Drone Maneuvers

 

Ensuring military forces have up-to-date information about a potentially hostile region offers obvious advantages, but current methods for doing that – especially along shorelines, where underwater mines and other hazards can pose serious risks – all have drawbacks. It is especially difficult if keeping the technology out of enemy hands is a priority.

UH Researchers Win $1M Award to Boost Student Success

Lisette Montemayor, incoming freshman, is part of UH's newest Student Success Program funded by the NSF.

The National Science Foundation awarded a $999,029 grant to a team of University of Houston researchers for a new program aimed at studying the impact of scholarships, engagement and other support on low-income students and their academic success.

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