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New Makerspace Now Open at UH Library

A new Makerspace at the UH Library is now open to all students.
A new Makerspace at the UH Library is now open to all students.

A new Makerspace at the University of Houston Libraries is now open.

The department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and UH Libraries have partnered to offer the UH community a dedicated space, located on the first floor of the MD Anderson Library within the Learning Commons, for building objects and electrical devices. All students on the UH campus, regardless of their college or department, are encouraged to explore the space and the opportunities it presents for discovery and collaboration.

The Makerspace comprises five work bays that are open to individuals or groups to use when engaged in maker activities. A sixth bay offers access to high-end measurement and testing equipment. Walk-up use and class reservations are available.

The MD Anderson Library offers check-out of a variety of low-power microelectronics kits and supplies, including Arduino Uno and TI LaunchPad, to work on in the Makerspace. Students are also welcome to bring their own materials. Basic support for maker activities is available from staff in the Makerspace Den during posted times.

A grand opening celebration is scheduled for February 23.

Department/Academic Programs: 

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