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UH Electrochemical Society Student Chapter off to a Successful Start

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By: 

Ashley Schwartz

Assistant Professor Yan Yao and several electrical and computer engineering and material science students have founded the first Electrochemical Society student chapter (UH ECS) at UH.

The Electrochemical Society is a national organization focused on advancing solid state and electrochemical science and technology. The society’s topical interests cover 13 divisions including batteries and energy storage, corrosion science and technology, electrochemical engineering and more.

For its first event, the organization hosted a seminar featuring prominent electrochemist Kang Xu, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Fellow, followed by a social event at the student center bowling alley. This event proved to be extremely successful, attracting more than150 students to join the organization.

On Wednesday, May 3, the UH ECS held a “Grilling for Good Grades” event on the engineering front lawn, handing out free refreshments to engineering students, faculty and staff.

“We hope that through these events we can bring together people of different interests who may not have connected otherwise,” said Ben Emley, UH ECS founding president. “Our goal is to provide support to anyone on campus interested in electrochemistry and its related fields.”

“UH ECS chapter was officially approved by ECS headquarter in June 2016,” said Yao. “I felt it was so important that the students at UH who are interested in energy and electrochemistry related subjects had a place to meet each other and potentially work together. I hope UH ECS members could take advantage of this platform to become leaders in the future.”

To learn more about the organization and how you can join, please email uhecsclub [at] gmail [dot] com.

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