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PHOTOS: 2015 Southwest ECEDHA Conference

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Natalie Thayer

Badri Roysam, chair of the Cullen College’s electrical and computer engineering department, was recently elected as the chair of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Heads Association (ECEDHA) editorial committee. As such, Roysam hosted the annual ECEDHA Southwest conference at the University of Houston on October 4th and 5th.

The two-day event brought leaders in the electrical and computer engineering academic field to the University of Houston’s campus to enjoy a reception and dinner on Sunday evening, as well as a day-long meeting on Monday to discuss progress and trends in the field. At the evening reception, electrical and computer engineering professor Jose Luis "Pepe" Contreras-Vidal presented a “Brain on Dance” performance during which the dancer’s brainwaves were projected on a screen behind her in real time.

View photos from the conference here.

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