CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Dr. Grabow, Lars C.

Research Grant Targeting “Holy Grail” of Catalysis

Lars Grabow

Lars Grabow has been given a $750,000 grant to solve a multi-billion dollar problem.

Methane, the majority component of natural gas, is cheap and plentiful, thanks in large part to hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. Ideally, it could be converted into rarer and far more valuable chemicals like methanol, ethane or ethylene, all of which have dozens of uses, many involving the creation of plastics and polymers.

NSF, DOE Partner to Support UH Diesel Emissions Research

Much of this diesel emissions reduction research will be conducted at the Texas Center for Clean Engines, Emissions and Fuels, a UH-based center dedicated to developing and testing advanced power-train, renewable or alternative fuels and emission control systems for local, state and federal governments as well as the energy, engine and emission control industries.

One of the ironies of automobile research: as diesel engines become more fuel efficient, reducing their emissions becomes more challenging.

Better efficiency means that more of the energy in diesel fuel is being used to move the vehicle and less is escaping out the tailpipe in the form of heat. While this is undoubtedly good, it presents a challenge for emissions reduction.

Catalysis Research Could Drive Down Biofuel Costs

Grabow

While the benefits of biofuels are clear, the economics of their production hinder their widespread use. A professor with the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering, however, has won a grant to conduct research that could make biofuels competitive with oil based fuels like gasoline and diesel.

Science Paper has Ramifications for Fuel Cells, Hydrogen Storage

Grabow

Science, one of the world’s leading scientific journals, has published an article co-authored by a professor with the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering that uncovers how hydrogen moves along an iron oxide surface when in the presence of water. The findings could have implications for everything from hydrogen storage to catalysis to fuel cell-powered vehicles.

Cullen College Welcomes Nine New Faculty Members

The Cullen College of Engineering’s strategic plan to achieve tier one status includes a significant increase in its faculty count. With nine new tenured or tenure-track faculty members joining the college for the 2011fall semester, it is clearly making great progress toward that goal. These faculty members run the gamut from newly minted Ph.D.s to a highly respected member of the National Academy of Engineering. They are:

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