University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Dr. Bao, Jiming

Unexpected Discovery Leads to New Theory of Liquid Streaming

Yanan Wang, a post-doctoral researcher at UH, is co-first author on a paper describing the discovery of a new principle of optofluidics

UH Researchers Generate a Liquid Stream with a Pulsed Laser

Researchers at the University of Houston were studying the nonlinear transmission of light through an aqueous suspension of gold nanoparticles when they noticed something unexpected. A pulse laser appeared to have forced the movement of a stream of liquid in a glass laboratory cuvette.

Rotating and Aligning Graphene Flakes – A UH Engineer's Discovery Opens Doors to Progress

Associate Professor Jiming Bao and screen filled with graphene flakes suspended in solvent between two layers of glass. Bao discovered that a magnet rotates and aligns the flakes.

In 2010 graphene took center stage when the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to two scientists in the UK "for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene." At the UH Cullen College of Engineering, that same passion over pencil lead is shared by Jiming Bao, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, but he’s taken it to a whole new dimension,

ECE Professor and Ph.D. Student Publish Article in Nanotechnology

Double slit experiment. I1 and I2 are intensity profiles when only slit 1 or slit 2 is open, respectively. I12 is the intensity profile when both slits are open. I1+2 is the sum of I1 and I2, it is the intensity profile when there is no interference between two beams. Note that at the center of the screen when x = 0, I1(0) = I2(0) = Io, I12(0) = 4Io, but I1+2(0) = 2Io.

When a material known as graphene was first produced inside of a lab in 2004, the science and technology community buzzed with predictions that it would become the “next big thing” for the semiconductor industry. Graphene is essentially a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon which conducts heat and electricity with incredible efficiency, making it a homerun material for the semiconductor and electronic device manufacturing industries.

Diagnosing Diseases With Smart Phones

LEFT: The system being developed by Cullen College Researchers diagnoses disease by blocking holes with pathogens and some other connected material, in this case silver particles, preventing light from shining through. RIGHT: A close-up of nanoholes blocked by these particles.

Smart phones are capable of giving us directions when we’re lost, sending photos and videos to our friends in mere seconds, and even helping us find the best burger joint in a three-mile radius. But thanks to UH Cullen College of Engineering researchers, smart phones may soon be boasting another very important function: diagnosing diseases in real time.

Biofilm Prevention at Heart of Latest CAREER Award


The UH Cullen College of Engineering has won its fifth National Science Foundation CAREER Award of 2012. Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Jacinta Conrad received the five-year, $400,000 grant to develop surfaces that limit bacterial motility, or movement.

University Opens State-of-the-Art Clean Room

Photo by Thomas Shea

Researchers from Greater Houston area welcome

Even the tiniest speck of dust can be a nuisance when you are working with nano-sized objects.

That’s because these objects are so small, tens of thousands of times smaller than the diameter of a human hair, even the tiniest dust particle can seem enormous.

ECE Researchers to Redesign Key Material Used in Electronics, Solar Device


Study could expand device capabilities

On a bright day, every 10 square feet of the earth’s surface is exposed to near 1,000 watts of energy from the sun. That translates to about 1 kilowatt an hour—easily enough to power our modern lives for free.

There is just one problem. The solar cells responsible for turning this bounty of sunbeams into energy are only capable of capturing certain rays from the sun.