General Information

Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
Map & Driving Directions (includes parking information)
Email: info [at] egr [dot] uh [dot] edu

CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Texas Diesel Testing and Research Center

Work With Catalysts Changes Grad Students Into Award Winners

Wendy Lang, Sashank Kasiraju and Wei Qin in the lab where award-winning work takes place

Three Cullen College chemical engineering Ph.D. students have returned from Denver, Co. where they were special guests at the 25th North American Meeting (NAM25) of the North American Catalysis Society. Sashank Kasiraju, who studies under the direction of Assistant Professor Lars Grabow, Wendy Lang, who studies under Mike Harold, chair of chemical and biomolecular engineering and Wei Qin, mentored by Jeff Rimer, Ernest J. and Barbara M.

UH Students Building Formula One-Style Race Car

Mottershaw, Abughazaleh and Gallery

Though the Society for Automotive Engineers (SAE) once boasted an active University of Houston student chapter, the organization has been dormant on the UH campus for several years. Now, a group of dedicated Cullen College of Engineering students are bringing the student organization back to campus and into the fast lane – literally.

NSF, DOE Partner to Support UH Diesel Emissions Research

Much of this diesel emissions reduction research will be conducted at the Texas Center for Clean Engines, Emissions and Fuels, a UH-based center dedicated to developing and testing advanced power-train, renewable or alternative fuels and emission control systems for local, state and federal governments as well as the energy, engine and emission control industries.

One of the ironies of automobile research: as diesel engines become more fuel efficient, reducing their emissions becomes more challenging.

Better efficiency means that more of the energy in diesel fuel is being used to move the vehicle and less is escaping out the tailpipe in the form of heat. While this is undoubtedly good, it presents a challenge for emissions reduction.

Diesel Center Hosts Fuel Economy Roundtable

Prof. Michael Harold speaks at the Texas Diesel Research and Testing Center's Industry Roundtable on Feb. 21, 2012. (Photo by Nine Nguyen)

When analyzed from the oil well to wheels on the ground, diesel is the single most efficient liquid transportation fuel. Combine that with rising petroleum prices and concerns about peak oil production, and it is clear that there is a real and growing need to improve efficiency and reduce emissions from diesel-powered vehicles.

Diesel Center Researching Marine Vehicle Emissions

Muncrief

The Cullen College's Texas Diesel Research and Testing Center was founded, in part, to develop technologies that reduce emissions from diesel vehicles. Researchers at the center have worked to cut pollution from everything from school buses to garbage trucks to heavy construction equipment. Thanks to a recent $163,000 grant, it can now add one more vehicle to that list: commercial fishing boats.

Diesel Center Researchers Earn $1M EPA Grant to Retrofit HISD School Buses

Using a $1 million grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Texas Diesel Testing and Research Center at the University of Houston will retrofit Houston Independent School District school buses with a system that attempts to diminish the negative impact their diesel emissions can have on the environment. UH researchers will supervise the installation of Nett Technologies’ BlueMAX Selective Catalytic Reduction System on buses.

Diesel Center Researchers Earn EPA Grant to Retrofit School Buses

Muncrief

Using a $1 million grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Texas Diesel Testing and Research Center at the University of Houston will retrofit school buses with a system that attempts to diminish the negative impact their diesel emissions can have on the environment.

A Bright Green Future: Researchers Work to Turn Algae Into Crude Oil

Harold

Inside the University of Houston Texas Diesel Testing and Research Center, space is typically reserved for finding ways to clean harmful pollutants from diesel vehicle exhaust through retrofit systems attached to tailpipes.

But recently, diesel center researchers have taken on a new project intended to expand the center’s clean air focus. They are examining glass beakers filled with samples of a slimy green substance most find growing in ponds, swamps and even dirty swimming pools.

UH Granted $2.5 Million to Test Retrofit Devices That Clean Diesel Exhaust

Harold

Diesel engines are the workhorses of American economy, powering everything from heavy-duty construction vehicles and buses to ships.

These engines are also one of the biggest producers of harmful pollutants, churning out more smog-causing Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) and near 100 times more sooty particles than their gasoline counterparts.

UH Diesel Center Finishes Expansion Doubling Size, Capabilities

A heavy-duty engine dynamometer is one of many new additions to the Texas Diesel Research and Testing Center. Photo by Thomas Shea.

The Texas Diesel Testing and Research Center at the University of Houston recently finished an expansion doubling its size and increasing its means to research and test retrofit devices that reduce the amount of harmful pollutants emitted from heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust.

Quality Studies Top Priority for Engineers at UH

UH’s Diesel Vehicle Research and Testing Facility, initiated in advance of the Bush administration’s Clean Air Nonroad Diesel Rule signed by the EPA in May, will be unveiled to the public during a ribbon-cutting ceremony with Houston Mayor Bill White at 3 p.m., Monday, June 28.

Clean Diesel Benefits Houston

At Houston’s newly-developed Diesel Vehicle Research and Testing Facility today, EPA Regional Administrator Richard E. Greene announced the Bush administration’s Clean Air Nonroad Diesel Rule will cut emission levels from construction, agricultural and industrial diesel engines by more than 90 percent. The rule was signed by EPA Administrator Mike Leavitt yesterday.

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