General Information

Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
Map & Driving Directions (includes parking information)
Email: info [at] egr [dot] uh [dot] edu

CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

Diesel Center Researchers Earn $1M EPA Grant to Retrofit HISD School Buses

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

Using a $1 million grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Texas Diesel Testing and Research Center at the University of Houston will retrofit Houston Independent School District school buses with a system that attempts to diminish the negative impact their diesel emissions can have on the environment. UH researchers will supervise the installation of Nett Technologies’ BlueMAX Selective Catalytic Reduction System on buses. Then, over the course of the next two years, they will analyze the system’s ability to reduce smog-causing Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) and sooty particles being released through emissions using a series of real-world tests.

Full Story

Department: 

Centers/Programs: 

Related News Stories

UH Materials Research Society Student Chapter Hosts Campus Symposium

Winners all around at the UH-MRS symposium!

The University of Houston-Materials Research Society Chapter (UH-MRS) hosted its first student symposium in the main lobby of engineering building 1. At the symposium students presented their work to an esteemed crowd of professional members across various engineering and science disciplines at UH. The 40 presenters came from different departments including chemistry, physics; and chemical, mechanical, materials and electrical engineering.

UH-MRS winners are:

Academia, Industry Collaborate on Solutions to Neural Disease, Injury

Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal, Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen University Professor of electrical and computer engineering, will head the new NSF-funded BRAIN Center

Neurological disorders like Parkinson’s, the aftermath of stroke, limb loss and paralysis significantly diminish the length and quality of life – affecting about one in six people worldwide. But a growing number of biomedical innovations, driven in large part by an aging population dealing with debilitating health issues, are improving both cognitive and motor function.