Research News Highlight

Post-doc Earns Travel Grant for Cancer Immunotherapy Research

The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC, selected Gabrielle Romain, post-doctoral research fellow in the UH Cullen College of Engineering, to present her research on cancer immunotherapy at its 30th anniversary annual meeting. With an approximate $750 travel grant, she plans to attend the conference in National Harbor, Maryland, in November.

Magnesium-ion Batteries in the Fast Lane

Yan Yao, assistant professor in the Cullen College’s electrical and computer engineering department, is developing alternatives to popular lithium-ion batteries, which are used to power much of the modern world.

Baby See, Baby Do? UH Research Targets Youngest Subjects

In research aimed at determining how babies and toddlers begin to understand the actions of others, a University of Houston research team is studying brain activity triggered by playtime interactions.

The study involves children from six months to 24 months old

Undergraduate Research Day 2014!

This year's Undergraduate Research Day will take place Thursday, October 9th at 4 p.m. in the Rockwell Pavilion at the M.D. Anderson Library at the University of Houston main campus.

Out of the 150 undergraduate researchers showcasing their posters and oral presentations, 20 will be undergraduates from the UH Cullen College of Engineering.

Engineering Professor Earns Grants to Develop Device-to-Device Communication

Zhu Han

Signals from smart phones are routed through base transceiver stations when they communicate, regardless of their proximity to their destinations. Signals from phones belonging to friends calling or texting in the same room must find distant base stations before they connect, just as signals from friends’ phones located in opposite corners of the city must find base stations.

ECE Professor Developing Sodium-Ion Batteries With NSF Award

Yan Yao

Last June, Texas Gov. Rick Perry drove an electric car made by Tesla Motors in front of the Texas State Capitol Building in Austin – a symbolic gesture meant to signify his intention of convincing Tesla executives to build their more than $4 billion battery factory right here in the Lone Star State.

Chemical Engineering Professor Researches New Materials for 3-D Printing

The latest developments in three-dimensional printing technology are opening doors to advances in research fields like medicine, computing and electronics. But while these advances are promising, the feedstocks used in 3-d printing are still mostly limited to simple polymers, which are great for constructing trinkets and demo devices but not as useful when looking to create complex circuit boards or flexible, bendable wiring.

ECE Professor and Ph.D. Student Publish Article in Nanotechnology

Double slit experiment. I1 and I2 are intensity profiles when only slit 1 or slit 2 is open, respectively. I12 is the intensity profile when both slits are open. I1+2 is the sum of I1 and I2, it is the intensity profile when there is no interference between two beams. Note that at the center of the screen when x = 0, I1(0) = I2(0) = Io, I12(0) = 4Io, but I1+2(0) = 2Io.

When a material known as graphene was first produced inside of a lab in 2004, the science and technology community buzzed with predictions that it would become the “next big thing” for the semiconductor industry. Graphene is essentially a one-atom-thick sheet of carbon which conducts heat and electricity with incredible efficiency, making it a homerun material for the semiconductor and electronic device manufacturing industries.

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