Dr. Shih, Wei-Chuan

Shih promoted to SPIE Fellow

Dr. Wei-Chuan Shih, a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering, has been promoted to a Fellow by SPIE.

Dr. Wei-Chuan Shih, a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering, has been promoted to a Fellow by SPIE for his contributions in novel imaging methods, spectroscopic techniques and plasmonic nanostructures with various applications in chemical and biosensing.

New Technology Allows More Precise View of the Smallest Nanoparticles

Wei-Chuan Shih, professor of electrical and computer engineering at UH, is the corresponding author for a paper about a new optical imaging technology for nanoscale objects, relying upon unscattered light to detect nanoparticles as small as 25 nanometers in diameter.

Imaging Technology Offers Advantages for Diagnostics, Other Uses

Current state-of-the-art techniques have clear limitations when it comes to imaging the smallest nanoparticles, making it difficult for researchers to study viruses and other structures at the molecular level.

UH Cullen College of Engineering Presents Inaugural Innovator Awards

Venkat Selvamanickam, M.D. Anderson Chair professor of mechanical engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, won the 2019 Career Innovator Award

Faculty, students recognized for innovation, creative entrepreneurial spirit

 

Innovation is the engine that drives all of humanity’s greatest achievements – from the creation of the first wheel to electricity to heart transplants. And it is the entrepreneurial spirit that puts these advances into the hands of the people who can use it the most.

Cullen College Celebrates Excellence With Outstanding Service Awards

Engineering faculty, staff and students recognized

 

The UH Cullen College of Engineering celebrated excellence in the ranks at its recent faculty and staff meeting. Joseph W. Tedesco, Elizabeth D. Rockwell Dean of the College, handed out numerous awards recognizing faculty, staff and students for their outstanding contributions in teaching, research and service.

Two UH Scientists Named to National Academy of Inventors

Wei-Chuan Shih, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, focuses on developing new sensing and imaging techniques. The new senior members will be recognized when NAI meets in Houston this spring.

Cullen College of Engineering's Wei-Chuan Shih Elected to First Class of NAI Senior Members

 

Two researchers with the University of Houston have been named senior members of the National Academy of Inventors in recognition of their contributions to scientific and technological innovation.

Researchers Create Smartphone System to Test for Lead in Water

UH researchers built a self-contained smartphone microscope that can operate in both fluorescence and dark-field imaging modes and paired it with an inexpensive Lumina 640 smartphone with an 8-megapixel camera.

Unlike Most Commercially Available Tests, It Can Detect Levels Below EPA Standards

 

The discovery of lead in Flint, Michigan’s drinking water drew renewed attention to the health risks posed by the metal. Now researchers at the University of Houston have created an inexpensive system using a smartphone and a lens made with an inkjet printer that can detect lead in tap water at levels commonly accepted as dangerous.

The Media Comes Calling: Excitement Over Invention That Turns Smartphone into a Microscope

Electrical and computer engineering Associate Professor Wei-Chuan Shih and his DotLens technology

An invention by a University of Houston engineer that turns your smartphone into a microscope, allowing it to detect whether your pond water is healthy, is getting attention in the media. Houston’s CBS affiliate, KHOU-TV Channel 11 aired a story about the invention of the DotLens, which came to life in the laboratory of electrical and computer engineering Associate Professor Wei-Chuan Shih.

UH Engineers Invent Glucose-Sensing Contact Lens

Blood testing is the standard option for checking glucose levels, but a new technology could allow non-invasive testing via a contact lens that samples glucose levels in tears.

Pages