Dr. Kostarelos, Konstantinos

New Clues Help Explain Why PFAS Chemicals Resist Remediation

Research led by Konstantinos Kostarelos of UH Energy suggests why PFAS, known as “forever chemicals” because they can persist in the environment for decades, are so difficult to permanently remove and offers new avenues for better remediation practices.

Work Suggests New Avenues for Cleaning Up These ‘Forever Chemicals’

 

The synthetic chemicals known as PFAS, short for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are found in soil and groundwater where they have accumulated, posing risks to human health ranging from respiratory problems to cancer.

UH Petroleum Engineering Program Receives Specialty Equipment Donation

Konstantinos Kostarelos, an associate professor of petroleum engineering, with two graduate students (Pushpesh Sharma in the center, Parth Jain to the left) in his Subsurface Research Lab.

Chevron Gift to Help Research, Prepare Students for Jobs

 

Scientific research takes time and involves a lot of specialized equipment that come with hefty price tags. Konstantinos Kostarelos, an associate professor of petroleum engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering known for innovative research in the oil and gas field, can attest to this fact.

Researchers Study Deepwater Gas Formation to Prevent Accidents

Work at UH Has Implications for Subsea Design and Operations

A team of researchers from the University of Houston is working with the oil industry to develop new ways to predict when an offshore drilling rig is at risk for a potentially catastrophic accident.

UH Engineer Creates New Technology to Keep Oil Flowing

Konstantinos Kostarelos with his prototype that electro-kinetically removes sludge and gunk from crude oil pipes

Konstantinos Kostarelos, associate professor in petroleum engineering, is building a new device to address the issue of blockage inside crude oil pipes. It’s a big problem in the oil industry. Companies typically spend a lot of money on chemical dispersants and inhibitors to address the issue and then they may still have to physically clean out the pipes by scraping the solids that have accumulated with devices called “pigs.”