CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Dr. Ghasemi, Hadi

UH Materials Research Society Student Chapter Hosts Campus Symposium

Winners all around at the UH-MRS symposium!

The University of Houston-Materials Research Society Chapter (UH-MRS) hosted its first student symposium in the main lobby of engineering building 1. At the symposium students presented their work to an esteemed crowd of professional members across various engineering and science disciplines at UH. The 40 presenters came from different departments including chemistry, physics; and chemical, mechanical, materials and electrical engineering.

UH-MRS winners are:

Hadi Ghasemi Creates New Material, Breaks Limits of Leidenfrost Phenomenon

Breaking limits: Hadi Ghasemi at the controls

UH engineer Hadi Ghasemi, Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering, is set to change history with his invention of a new material that provides efficient heat dissipation at high temperatures and eliminates a 250-year-old scientific event known as the Leidenfrost Phenomenon.

UH Cullen College Engineer Creates Better Than State-of-the-Art Materials to Repel Ice

Iceman: Assistant Professor Hadi Ghasemi (far left) is joined by students Seyed Mohammad Sajadi, Peyman Irajizad and Nazanin Farokhnia. Irajizad holds the new magnetic slippery surface.

In 1989, an Air Ontario flight, with ice and snow covering its wings during takeoff, fails to attain the proper altitude. Unable to get above the trees, it crashes into them, killing 25 passengers. In 1994, an American Eagle plane flies into treacherous icing conditions and the pilots lose control of the plane. It crashes, killing all 68 souls onboard. From 1990 to 2000, 12 percent of all weather-related air disasters were due to icing.

American Society of Indian Engineers Recognizes Cullen College Students with Scholarships

Gahlawat, right, with White at the ASIE banquet.

This fall, the American Society of Indian Engineers (ASIE) took notice of several Cullen College of Engineering students and awarded their academic excellence with scholarships ranging from $1,000 to $5,000.

Mechanical engineering students Sonika Gahlawat, Abhilash Reddy and Himani Agrawal were just a few of the students honored by the ASIE at their banquet in November. Ken White, professor of mechanical engineering, also attended.

Professor Publishes Paper on Polymers with High Thermal Conductivity

Expensive and weighty metals play crucial roles in heat transfer applications because of their high thermal conductivity. For example, cases for cellular phones and some other electronics are made of metal rather than inexpensive materials with lower thermal conductivity because the metal is necessary to dissipate induced internal heat.