CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Dr. Ghasemi, Hadi

Cullen College Celebrates Excellence With Outstanding Service Awards

Engineering faculty, staff and students recognized

 

The UH Cullen College of Engineering celebrated excellence in the ranks at its recent faculty and staff meeting. Joseph W. Tedesco, Elizabeth D. Rockwell Dean of the College, handed out numerous awards recognizing faculty, staff and students for their outstanding contributions in teaching, research and service.

UH, MIT Thermal Research Published in Nature Communications

By mixing polymer powder in solution to generate a film that they then stretched, researchers have changed polyethylene's microstructure, from spaghetti-like clumps of molecular chains (left), to straighter strands (right), allowing heat to conduct through the polymer, better than most metals. Credit: Image courtesy of Ji Liu, Shaoting Lin, and Xinyue Liu (Gang Chen et al).

New polymer films conduct heat like metals

Polymers, also known as plastics, can be found in almost every kind of modern technological products – from soft robotics and organic electronics to 3D printing and artificial skin. The unique characteristics of polymers, which are cost-effective, lightweight and corrosion-resistant, make them ideal components in general.

Cullen College Faculty Win UH Research Awards

Hadi Ghasemi, Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering, is renowned for his work involving innovative materials and icephobicity

Ghasemi and Vekilov in the Spotlight

 

Two Cullen College of Engineering faculty won the University of Houston’s Awards for Excellence in Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity for the 2018-19 academic year. Hadi Ghasemi was recognized in the “Assistant Professor” category and Peter Vekilov was honored in the “Professor” category.

UH Researchers Report Breakthrough in Ice-Repelling Materials

Researchers led by Hadi Ghasemi, Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering at UH, have created a durable silicone polymer coating capable of repelling ice from any surface.

Work Has Implications for Aircraft, Power Transmission Lines and More

 

Icy weather is blamed for multibillion dollar losses every year in the United States, including delays and damage related to air travel, infrastructure and power generation and transmission facilities. Finding effective, durable and environmentally stable de-icing materials has been stymied by the stubborn tenacity with which ice adheres to the materials on which it forms.

UH Materials Research Society Student Chapter Hosts Campus Symposium

Winners all around at the UH-MRS symposium!

The University of Houston-Materials Research Society Chapter (UH-MRS) hosted its first student symposium in the main lobby of engineering building 1. At the symposium students presented their work to an esteemed crowd of professional members across various engineering and science disciplines at UH. The 40 presenters came from different departments including chemistry, physics; and chemical, mechanical, materials and electrical engineering.

UH-MRS winners are:

Hadi Ghasemi Creates New Material, Breaks Limits of Leidenfrost Phenomenon

Breaking limits: Hadi Ghasemi at the controls

UH engineer Hadi Ghasemi, Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering, is set to change history with his invention of a new material that provides efficient heat dissipation at high temperatures and eliminates a 250-year-old scientific event known as the Leidenfrost Phenomenon.

UH Cullen College Engineer Creates Better Than State-of-the-Art Materials to Repel Ice

Iceman: Assistant Professor Hadi Ghasemi (far left) is joined by students Seyed Mohammad Sajadi, Peyman Irajizad and Nazanin Farokhnia. Irajizad holds the new magnetic slippery surface.

In 1989, an Air Ontario flight, with ice and snow covering its wings during takeoff, fails to attain the proper altitude. Unable to get above the trees, it crashes into them, killing 25 passengers. In 1994, an American Eagle plane flies into treacherous icing conditions and the pilots lose control of the plane. It crashes, killing all 68 souls onboard. From 1990 to 2000, 12 percent of all weather-related air disasters were due to icing.

American Society of Indian Engineers Recognizes Cullen College Students with Scholarships

Gahlawat, right, with White at the ASIE banquet.

This fall, the American Society of Indian Engineers (ASIE) took notice of several Cullen College of Engineering students and awarded their academic excellence with scholarships ranging from $1,000 to $5,000.

Mechanical engineering students Sonika Gahlawat, Abhilash Reddy and Himani Agrawal were just a few of the students honored by the ASIE at their banquet in November. Ken White, professor of mechanical engineering, also attended.

Professor Publishes Paper on Polymers with High Thermal Conductivity

Expensive and weighty metals play crucial roles in heat transfer applications because of their high thermal conductivity. For example, cases for cellular phones and some other electronics are made of metal rather than inexpensive materials with lower thermal conductivity because the metal is necessary to dissipate induced internal heat.

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