CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Faculty Accolades

NIH Grant to Study Breast Cancer

David Mayerich is part of NIH-backed group creating a new device to study breast cancer

David Mayerich, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the UH Cullen College, is part of a national group receiving funds from the National Institutes of Health to study breast cancer.

The group will develop a new device which will mimic organ-specific breast cancer metastasis patterns. The device will be tissue-engineered and will investigate what regulates organ specificity and why some cells undergo dormancy.

Stanko Brankovic Wins Top Award in Field of Chemical Engineering

Stanko Brankovic's work in electrochemicals electrifies leading organization

If there were Academy Awards in the field of electrochemical material science, Stanko Brankovic, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at the Cullen College and past chair of the materials science division of the International Society of Electrochemistry, would be taking home an Oscar.

Taking The Reins of Power (Over Power) Wins Best Paper Award for Cullen College Team

Powering up: Saeedeh Abbasi (center) works to restore power with the help Gino Lim and Masoud Barati

Whether you’ve suffered through a major Houston hurricane, flood event or momentary glitch in the power grid, no doubt you understand the severity of a power blackout. And lest you think Houston has cornered the market on such catastrophes, think back to 2003 when the biggest blackout in U.S. history left 50 million people in darkness in the northeast corner of America stretching into Canada.

Tesla Vs. Musk: Cullen College’s Faghih Weighs In

Rose Faghih in U.S. News and World Report

The similarities between engineering pioneers Elon Musk and Nikola Tesla, who Musk named his electric car after, are being debated on the national stage.

U.S. News & World Report offers that Tesla went broke pushing his obsession with wireless communication and power transmission on a world that wasn’t yet ready in 1900, and poses the question whether the same could happen to Musk as he relentlessly pursues technology.

Yan Yao Amps Up His Game: Becomes a Scialog Fellow

Charged up: Yan Yao is making better batteries

If there’s one thing Yan Yao gets a charge out of, it’s the idea of creating a better battery. The Cullen College assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering is known for being the most current in the battery industry. A Google search yields more than 16,000 citations of papers by Yao.

Becker’s Robots and Students Visit Charter School

Oliver, a fourth grader at UH Charter School, is keen on learning about robots

When Aaron Becker, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at the Cullen College, took seven engineering students to the UH Charter elementary school to play with robots, he wasn’t just opening young minds – he was upholding the charter school’s vision to help students fulfill their potential through wonder and discovery.

For Stanko Brankovic, Life is Speeding Up

Professor Stanko Brankovic, first to understand speed of forming catalysts

That exciting feeling you get when you've made a breakthrough discovery and you know that something that seemed impossible yesterday is now completely clear – that's the feeling that Stanko Brankovic, professor of electrical and computer engineering, has about his recent discovery of the speed in which catalysts are formed.

“I’m in the same position as Sir Isaac Newton was when the apple hit him in the head! It’s that same excitement, a ‘Wow!' moment,” said Brankovic.

Rotating and Aligning Graphene Flakes – A UH Engineer's Discovery Opens Doors to Progress

Associate Professor Jiming Bao and screen filled with graphene flakes suspended in solvent between two layers of glass. Bao discovered that a magnet rotates and aligns the flakes.

In 2010 graphene took center stage when the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to two scientists in the UK "for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene." At the UH Cullen College of Engineering, that same passion over pencil lead is shared by Jiming Bao, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, but he’s taken it to a whole new dimension,

The Media Comes Calling: Excitement Over Invention That Turns Smartphone into a Microscope

Electrical and computer engineering Associate Professor Wei-Chuan Shih and his DotLens technology

An invention by a University of Houston engineer that turns your smartphone into a microscope, allowing it to detect whether your pond water is healthy, is getting attention in the media. Houston’s CBS affiliate, KHOU-TV Channel 11 aired a story about the invention of the DotLens, which came to life in the laboratory of electrical and computer engineering Associate Professor Wei-Chuan Shih.

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