CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Civil and Environmental Engineering

$3 Million DOE Project to Evaluate Safety of Transporting Used Nuclear Fuel, Develop Methods to Monitor Fuel Stability During Transit

Kaspar Willam of the Cullen College of Engineering will lead an effort to develop monitoring techniques to ensure nuclear materials remain stable during transit under both normal conditions and in case of an accident.

With more than 74,000 metric tons of used nuclear fuel stored at locations around the United States, ensuring the safety of moving it to more secure disposal sites is a top federal priority.

A University of Houston engineer will lead a $3 million, multi-institution effort to develop monitoring techniques to ensure the nuclear materials remain stable during transit under both normal conditions and in case of an accident.

PHOTOS: H. David Hibbitt Rockwell Lecture

Computer simulation software allows engineers to predict how certain materials will perform under specific – and often extreme – conditions. For instance, major advances in aerospace and flight were made possible due to engineering simulation based on computational solid mechanics, leading to pioneering work conducted by the company Boeing.

Cullen College Engineers Bring TxDOT Bridge Ratings Up to Date

Driving in Texas? You'll appreciate the work of (L-R) Mina Dawood, Qianmei (May) Feng and Abdeldjelil Belarbi

Take a car trip from Houston and you’ll likely drive over one of the 50,000 bridges that span the great state of Texas. During your drive you probably never wondered if the weight limits on the bridges were accurate. But then, that’s why we have Mina Dawood, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering in the Cullen College.

VIDEO: Engineers and Engineering in the Movies

Once upon a time you got your best action and science fiction fix from the movies.

“2001: A Space Odyssey” showed us how pedestrian structures on the moon might seem; Walt Disney brought us tiny robots called microbots in “Big Hero 6”; Robert Zemeckis convinced us we wouldn’t need roads when he created Marty McFly’s hoverboard in “Back to the Future II”; and, “The Fast and The Furious” showed us what it would be like to fly like the wind while staying on track.

Photos: Women in Manufacturing Events Hosted at UH Engineering

There was a time in the not-so-distant past when women in manufacturing jobs were hard to come by. It wasn’t until World War II when, faced with a depleted workforce, American women rolled up their sleeves and went to work in factories and shipyards across the country.

A BARREL of Fun and Science for Cullen College Students Launching Payloads

BARREL ballon inflated just before launch Aug 13. Photo courtesy of NASA-Edgar Bering

It actually does take a rocket scientist to be a rocket scientist. Case in point: Professor of physics and electrical engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering Edgar Bering, whose business card really does say he’s a rocket scientist – and for good reason. He’s been working with NASA on sending things airborne for decades.

Cullen College Professor Discusses World’s Largest Indoor Waterfall with WIRED Magazine

Singapore’s Changi Airport, voted the world’s best airport for the fourth consecutive year, already offers travelers a wide array of top-notch amenities, including a rooftop pool, 24-hour cinema, butterfly garden and multiple spas. But in 2018, the airport will unveil its newest attraction – the world’s tallest indoor waterfall called the Rain Vortex.

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