CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

BRAIN Center

Your Brain on Wine and on Stage: Experts Look at the Neuroscience

A brain-skull cap is a non-invasive way to collect data on brain activity.

Wine has been around for millennia. Now engineers and wine experts at the University of Houston are teaming up to better understand how aroma, taste, color and other factors contribute to the experience of drinking wine.

Researchers will collect data on brain waves, motion and galvanic responses as wine experts from the UH Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management conduct a wine tasting at 2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 18, at the Hilton University of Houston.

‘Smart’ Robotic System Could Offer Home-Based Rehabilitation

While early prototypes of robotic rehabilitation systems controlled by the user's own brain required the use of skullcaps embedded with sensors, researchers are developing a simpler version that can be used at home.

Industry Partnership Supports Faster Track to Commercialize Accessible Healthcare

 

Researchers in Houston and elsewhere have shown that robotic systems controlled by the user’s own brain activity can help patients recovering from stroke and other disabling injuries. But the demonstrations have taken place in highly controlled settings, and none of the systems have been approved for use in clinics or patient’s homes.

UH Professor Part of National Event on the Interworking of Art and the Brain

Jose Contreras-Vidal, a UH researcher, in discussion with a dancer for his "Brain on Art" research.

Contreras-Vidal seeks to answer what happens in the brain as people create and enjoy art

 

Bringing together scientific research and artistic inquiry is a serious mission for the D.C. Art Science Evening Rendezvous (DASER). It offers monthly conversations about different interdisciplinary topics with invited speakers from all over America.

Nature Magazine Features UH Professor’s Work to Address Paralysis

Nature features University of Houston Professor Jose Contreras-Vidal, known for his work to improve prostheses using brain-machine interfaces.

About 3.5 million people in America are living with some degree of paralysis related to stroke, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy. Nature magazine this month published an article about scientists developing technological solutions, such as neural prostheses or devices that read brain signals and help restore movement in paralyzed patients.

Academia, Industry Collaborate on Solutions to Neural Disease, Injury

Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal, Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen University Professor of electrical and computer engineering, will head the new NSF-funded BRAIN Center

Neurological disorders like Parkinson’s, the aftermath of stroke, limb loss and paralysis significantly diminish the length and quality of life – affecting about one in six people worldwide. But a growing number of biomedical innovations, driven in large part by an aging population dealing with debilitating health issues, are improving both cognitive and motor function.