Research News Highlight

Researchers Seek to Improve Quality Control for Nanomanufacturing

Venkat Selvamanickam, MD Anderson Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Houston

New Monitoring Tool Would Be Able To Detect Imperfections Almost Instantaneously

Researchers from the University of Houston are developing a new quality control tool for continuous nanomanufacturing, a key step in moving nanodevices from the lab to the real world.

“Nanomanufacturing sounds great, but it really has to be scalable,” said Venkat Selvamanickam, MD Anderson Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering. “You have to be able to control the quality.”

Nature Magazine Features UH Professor’s Work to Address Paralysis

Nature features University of Houston Professor Jose Contreras-Vidal, known for his work to improve prostheses using brain-machine interfaces.

About 3.5 million people in America are living with some degree of paralysis related to stroke, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy. Nature magazine this month published an article about scientists developing technological solutions, such as neural prostheses or devices that read brain signals and help restore movement in paralyzed patients.

Battery Expert Powers Up With a Scialog Award

Yan Yao, a University of Houston engineering professor, wins a Scialog award for his work with batteries.

When it comes to batteries, UH engineer Yan Yao never runs out of award-winning ideas.

Yao, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at the UH Cullen College, and his research partners are known for their work to create better, safer and longer lasting batteries in the energy storage field. 

Award Allows Engineers to Pursue Technique for Assessing Systemic Sclerosis

Two professors at the UH Cullen College of Engineering earned a $200,000 Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program (PRMRP) Discovery Award from the U.S. Department of Defense to further explore a quantitative assessment technique for systemic sclerosis (SSc). The autoimmune disorder is characterized by thickening of soft tissues in the body caused by accumulations of collagen. 

Engineering Professor Discovers Gene Linked to Lupus

Lupus is an autoimmune disease that affects approximately 1.5 million Americans, according to the Lupus Foundation of America. In lupus patients, antibodies that are produced by the immune system’s B cells to protect the body against invading bacteria and viruses also attack the body’s healthy cells.

Engineering Research Shows Potential for Helping Lupus Patients

Tianfu Wu

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease without a cure and without a highly effective treatment option. Many scientists believe that genetics and environmental factors interact to cause immune cells in the human body to overreact and attack healthy cells and organs in the estimated 1.5 million Americans affected by the disease.

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