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Photos: UH Chemical Engineering Student Studies Abroad in Costa Rica

Amy Wang, a UH chemical engineering student, was awarded a SOL scholarship to study abroad in Costa Rica.

Studying abroad changes you and influences your life more than you’d expect. Being away from your familiar surroundings isn’t easy and can bring a steep learning curve that be a burst of personal development and growth.

In 2019 Amy Wang, a UH chemical engineering student, was awarded a SOL scholarship to study abroad in Costa Rica. The SOL education program offers an experience of interactive Spanish language, travel excursions and daily cultural activities.

In a weekly blog, Amy documents her daily experiences of learning about the culture in Costa Rica through hands on activities and what it’s like to live in this country through engagements with the selected host families. 

To read more about Amy’s study abroad experience, click here.

Interested in learning how you can study abroad at UH, click here.

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