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UH Research Related to Full-Color X-ray Images Highlighted

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Rashda Khan
Mini Das, associate professor of biomedical engineering and physics at UH.
Mini Das, associate professor of biomedical engineering and physics at UH.

Research from the Das Laboratory for Imaging Innovations at the University of Houston was recently highlighted in Nature Reviews Physics in a feature article titled “X-ray images in full color.”

The article provides an overview of the detector technologies developed at CERN – the European organization for nuclear research with the world’s largest particle physics facility – with the capability of producing stunning color X-ray computed tomography images. It also addresses the challenges of bringing those images to hospitals and ways to improve these detectors.

The original article, titled “Multi-step decomposition for spectral computed tomography,” appeared in Physics in Medicine and Biology earlier this year.

The lab is led by Mini Das, associate professor of biomedical engineering and physics at UH. All the projects in the lab are collaborative interdisciplinary efforts involving applied physics, optical physics, image science, biomedical engineering, electrical engineering, medical physics, vision science and psychophysics.

The physics and engineering developments out of the Das Lab have a broad range of applications, including in small animal imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as chemical, biological, materials and medical imaging.

Das mentors doctoral students in both engineering and physics.

To read the full article, please visit: https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6560/ab2b0e

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