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Nature Magazine Features UH Professor’s Work to Address Paralysis

By: 

Rashda Khan
Nature features University of Houston Professor Jose Contreras-Vidal, known for his work to improve prostheses using brain-machine interfaces.
Nature features University of Houston Professor Jose Contreras-Vidal, known for his work to improve prostheses using brain-machine interfaces.
One of Dr. Jose Contreras-Vidal's projects: a prosthetic hand with brain-machine interfacing
One of Dr. Jose Contreras-Vidal's projects: a prosthetic hand with brain-machine interfacing

Groundbreaking brain-machine interfacing with prostheses highlighted

About 3.5 million people in America are living with some degree of paralysis related to stroke, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy. Nature magazine this month published an article about scientists developing technological solutions, such as neural prostheses or devices that read brain signals and help restore movement in paralyzed patients.

The article prominently features Dr. Jose Contreras-Vidal, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, for his work to improve prostheses using brain-machine interfaces, or BMIs.

It also mentions his lab at the Building Reliable Advances and Innovation in Neurotechnology (BRAIN) Center, a collaboration between the University of Houston, Arizona State University and industry partners. The center is funded by a National Science Foundation grant.

Innovative neurotechnologies could save an estimated $400 billion in future costs, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Read the full article at: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02478-0

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