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Engineering Students Sweep Graduate Research & Scholarship Projects (GRaSP) Day

By: 

Audrey Grayson

Each year the University of Houston’s Graduate School and Office of the Provost invite all graduate students to showcase their groundbreaking research at the annual Graduate Research & Scholarship Projects (GRaSP) Day. Graduate students across all disciplines exhibit their research projects, network with peers and compete to receive trophies and scholarship awards for their research.

This year four of the 15 top honors went to UH engineering students.

Petroleum engineering doctoral student Anand Selveindran received the first place prize and $1,000 for his research poster titled “Cowden South Grayburg Field Development Review - Integrated Petroleum Reservoir Management.”

Yulung Sung, an electrical engineering doctoral student, also received the first place prize and $1,000 for his demonstration on how to transform any smartphone into a high resolution microscope.

Two biomedical engineering doctoral students earned second place prizes for their projects. Madeleine Lu took home a $750 cash prize for her award-winning talk on the use of microfluidic technologies for tiny blood volumes. Zuan-Tao Lin’s publication “A Nanoparticle-Decorated Biomolecule-Responsive Polymer Enables Robust Signaling Cascade for Biosensing” earned him the same cash prize.

Attendees enjoyed free breakfast, lunch and snacks throughout the day, with the event culminating in an awards ceremony in which the student winners were honored with their trophies.

Click here to learn more about and watch a video from this year’s GRaSP Day!

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