CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

Rigzone: Advice for Geotechnical Engineering Graduates from UH Civil Engineer

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

By: 

Audrey Grayson

Geotechnical engineers toil in the mechanics of soil and rocks to design and build structures, roadways, levees and other systems that are supported by soil or rock. Career opportunities abound for graduates in the geotechnical engineering field, but obtaining certain skillsets in this field can give geotechnical graduates an advantage in landing their dream job.

Cumaraswamy Vipulanandan, professor of civil and environmental engineering at the Cullen College and director of the Center for Innovative Grouting Materials and Technology (CIGMAT) and the Texas Hurricane Center for Innovative Technology (THC-IT), told Rigzone that geotechnical engineering job applicants with a proven ability to design structures such as foundations and support structures will jump to the top of most employers’ resume piles.

Click here to read the full article in Rigzone

Faculty: 

Department: 

Related News Stories

UH Engineering Professor Appointed Associate Editor of Clean Water Journal

Debora Rodrigues, an associate professor in civil and environmental engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, is now an associate editor of npj Clean Water

Debora Rodrigues, an associate professor in civil and environmental engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, recently accepted the invitation to serve as an associate editor of npj Clean Water, a new open access online journal dedicated to publishing papers about cutting-edge research aimed at ensuring the clean water supplies around the globe. It is published by Nature Research.

Mission: Possible — Mapping Dangerous Terrain

UH researchers are testing prototypes for the project in Brays Bayou.

UH Engineers Focus on Degradable Reconnaissance Vehicles and Evasive Drone Maneuvers

 

Ensuring military forces have up-to-date information about a potentially hostile region offers obvious advantages, but current methods for doing that – especially along shorelines, where underwater mines and other hazards can pose serious risks – all have drawbacks. It is especially difficult if keeping the technology out of enemy hands is a priority.

Upcoming Events / Seminars