CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

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PHOTOS: Student Research Takes Center Stage at 13th Annual Graduate Research and Capstone Design Conference

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By: 

Ashley Schwartz

The UH department of electrical and computer engineering hosted the Graduate Research and Capstone Design Conference (GRC/CDC) on April 28th at the UH Hilton. The day-long event included technical sessions in which graduate and undergraduate student research and projects were presented.

The following Cullen College students were awarded for their outstanding research projects:

First Place Capstone Design Project: Project: Independence (Moriah Hargrove Anders, Nancy Ibarra and Clayton Manchaca)

Second Place Capstone Design Project: Dynamic Braille Display (Daniel Lopez, Katherine Perez, Sergio Silva and David Garcia-Castellano)

Third Place Capstone Design Project: IEEE Robotics (Cuong Ha, Kasan Momin, Idam Obiahu and Tevin Richards)

First Place Urvish Medh and Betty Barr Award: Advanced Recognition of Terrain Transistions During Locomotion Via Non-Invasive EEG, Justin A. Brantley

Second Place Urvish Medh and Betty Barr Award: Development of Multi-Contact Probes with Thin Film Conductor Wiring on Optical Fiber Substrates, Tamanna Afrin Tisa

Third Place Urvish Medh and Betty Barr Award: Fast GPU-Based Segmentation for High-Throughput Time Lapse Imaging Microscopy in Nanowell Grids (Timing), Jiabing Li

You can view photos of the event here.

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