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Houston Chronicle Taps UH Engineering Expertise on Wireless Technology Upgrades for Super Bowl LI

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By: 

Ashley Schwartz

The Houston Chronicle tapped into the engineering expertise in the UH Cullen College of Engineering to learn whether Super Bowl LI fans will be able to Tweet, Facebook and Snapchat their experiences at Feb. 5 game at NRG Stadium.

In the past, many sports fans attending games at NRG Stadium were faced with the frustration of being inside a wireless “deadzone,” but recent updates to the stadium’s wireless infrastructure have made live Tweeting the big games possible again.

Zhu Han, professor of electrical and computer engineering, told Houston Chronicle reporter Andrea Rumbaugh that he doesn’t expect fans attending Super Bowl LI to experience any major issues with their wireless connectivity.

The article discusses the various improvements Houston has made to accommodate the large amounts of mobile users that will descend Super Bowl weekend. These improvements include a system of 783 small antennas in the stadium and throughout NRG Park, providing capacity equal to 54 cell towers.

Han conferred that overall cell coverage has improved in Houston and expects that attendees will have the ability to utilize social media during the Super Bowl despite the large crowd size.

Learn more about Houston’s mobile upgrades and view the full article here.

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