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UH Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Degree Among Best in Nation

By: 

Laurie Fickman

Earning a Bachelor of Science degree in chemical engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering means you are among the most talented chemical engineers in the U.S. – the UH program is ranked as one of the top 25 places in the U.S. to pursue the discipline. According to College Choice, UH is No. 23 out of the 25 Best Chemical Engineering Degrees for 2016-2017 and the 11th best state university department in the U.S.

“Our students are exposed to a rigorous curriculum intended to train them to be effective chemical engineers upon graduating from the University of Houston. It’s gratifying that others are acknowledging our undergraduate program,” said M.D. Anderson Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Michael Harold, chair of the department.

College Choice is an online publication designed to help students choose the right college. Their rankings are intended to make the choice easier.  The publication evaluates the value of the degree based on cost, reputation, and effectiveness in the job market.

In citing the Cullen College, College Choice cites that “In addition to six outside scholarships, awarded twice a year, the Cullen College of Engineering also awards a large number of merit-based scholarships to undergraduates.”

Read the full rankings here.

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