CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

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Professor Elected Optical Society Fellow

By: 

Elena Watts

Kirill Larin, professor and director of the biomedical engineering graduate program at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, was recently elected a Fellow of The Optical Society, OSA. He is recognized for his exceptional contributions to optical imaging in developmental biology and optical elastography.

Founded in 1916, the society, with 19,000 members, is the world’s preeminent professional association in optics and photonics with offerings that include publication subscriptions, meetings and programs about the science of light. In addition to membership benefits and recognition, Fellows can apply for travel grants to visit and lecture in developing countries.

Nominations for the fellowship are made by current OSA Fellows, who can comprise no more than 10 percent of the society’s total membership, according to the bylaws. The Fellow Members Committee reviews and recommends candidates to the OSA Board of Directors, and the number of Fellows elected each year is limited to approximately .4 percent of the current total membership.

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