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Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
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University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering


Subsea Engineering Program Bridges Gap Between Elementary School and College with "Passport to UH"

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Melanie Ziems

Classes may be over for the summer at UH, but that didn’t stop a group of burgeoning young scientists from getting their hands dirty around the Cullen College last week. A class of 40 fourth graders from Memorial Elementary was hosted by the Cullen College’s subsea engineering program for a tour of the engineering complex as well as other exciting UH landmarks, including lunch at the cougar baseball field.

The event, dubbed “Passport to UH,” is part of a new outreach partnership between Memorial Elementary and the Cullen College of Engineering led by Matthew Franchek, founding director of subsea engineering and mechanical engineering professor. As part of the growing relationship between both schools, UH students also spent time with ME students earlier in the semester for an “egg drop” challenge and will continue to bring engineering and STEM education into the grade school classroom.

Check out the pictures from Passport to UH here.



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