General Information

Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
Map & Driving Directions (includes parking information)
Email: info [at] egr [dot] uh [dot] edu

CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

Subsea Program Profiled in Offshore Publication

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

By: 

Toby Weber
Subsea Engineering Program Founding Director Matt Franchek (center left) with members of the Subsea Engineering Society, a group founded by UH students.
Subsea Engineering Program Founding Director Matt Franchek (center left) with members of the Subsea Engineering Society, a group founded by UH students.

OE magazine, a publication dedicated to the global offshore industry, has published an article profiling the subsea engineering program at the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering.

The article notes that the program began offering an M.S. in subsea engineering just this year and already has 70 students. That figure, said program director and professor of mechanical engineering Matt Franchek, is expected to triple by January 2015 thanks in part to online learning options. The most popular course in the program is flow assurance. That class is taught by Phaneendra Kondapi, an engineering manager at FMC Technologies and KBR Adjunct Professor, as well as the winner of the 2013 Teaching Excellence Award from the Society of Petroleum Engineers International. His course has more than 40 students, making it the largest graduate class at the University of Houston.

“Students enrolled in Dr. Kondapi’s flow assurance course are getting job offers just on taking that class.” Franchek said in the piece. “I don’t have anyone in subsea coming up to me and saying they can’t find a job.”

Click here to read the full article.

Faculty: 

Department: 

Related News Stories

How the Guardian of Our DNA Gets its Donut-Like Structure

Ph.D student Mehdi Torbati, left, and Dr. Ashutosh Agrawal and are peering into cell nuclei to improve health

Deep within your body there exists donut-shaped objects – many of them, in fact. No, these donuts aren’t from the box of Shipley’s that mysteriously disappeared, despite the fact your diet had just started. These particular donuts are the membranes of the nuclear envelope, which surround and protect the cell’s nucleus, where the all-important genetic material, or DNA, is stored.

“Bend” and “Flex” No Longer Just Terms for Exercise, They’ll Soon Describe Your Laptop!

Flexible glass tape, the basis for building flexible computers

Tired of lugging that heavy laptop in your padded backpack? Here’s an idea: When you’re finished using your laptop, just roll it up, fold it, stick it in your back pocket and bolt. That’s the incredible future being created in a UH Cullen College of Engineering laboratory – a flexible, thin-film transistor (TFT) that may one day make your current laptop a dinosaur.