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Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
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CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

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'There are no textbooks': Cullen College's Subsea Engineering Program Featured in DecomWorld

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By: 

Audrey Grayson

As the director of the nation's first-ever subsea engineering graduate program at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, Matthew Franchek is a key figure behind the new Global Subsea University Alliance.

Franchek, a professor of mechanical engineering at the Cullen College, spoke with DecomWorld about the efforts underway at the Cullen College to establish standardized curricula for the subsea engineering field so that both students and employers know what they’re getting from a subsea engineering degree, and how this new field of knowledge is racing to meet the challenges presented by deep water hydrocarbon production.

DecomWorld is a leading provider of business intelligence to the global offshore oil and gas energy community. The publication reaches over 15,000 professionals globally, on the highest priorities issues facing the industry.

Click here to read the full article in DecomWorld.

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