General Information

Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
Map & Driving Directions (includes parking information)
Email: info [at] egr [dot] uh [dot] edu

CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

Inaugural UH-TMHRI Graduate Scholar Selected

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

By: 

Esmeralda Fisher
Kevin Nathan

The first recipient of the joint University of Houston/The Methodist Hospital Research Institute (TMHRI) Graduate Fellowship in Clinical Translation has been selected.

Kevin Nathan (MSEE), a researcher in the UH department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, will work with professor Jose Contreras-Vidal of UH and Robert Grossman, M.D. of TMHRI on a project titled A Noninvasive Brain-Machine Interface to a Lower-Body Robotic Exoskeleton for Restoration of Gait.

This unique fellowship is designed for Ph.D. students who want to pursue a degree in engineering and biomedical research. The awardees of this fellowship will be enrolled in any Ph.D. program in the Cullen College of Engineering and will be co-mentored by a UH and TMHRI faculty member. The student will have opportunities to work in UH and TMHRI laboratories for the duration of their co-mentored project.

Faculty: 

Department: 

Related News Stories

Hurricane Harvey Resource Guide

The University of Houston MD Anderson Library is providing a guide to help navigate through the resources available in the wake of Hurricane Harvey and its devastating aftermath.

Researchers Report Breakthrough in Magnesium Batteries

This schematic shows the structural evolution of titanium disulfide at different stages of intercalation. Interlayers are expanded or distorted as different amounts of pillaring molecules, complex cations and solvents are intercalated into the van der Waals gap of a host material at each stage.

Nanostructured Cathode, Understanding of New Electrolyte Lead to Greater Efficiency

Magnesium batteries offer promise for safely powering modern life – unlike traditional lithium ion batteries, they are not flammable or subject to exploding – but their ability to store energy has been limited.