General Information

Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
Map & Driving Directions (includes parking information)
Email: info [at] egr [dot] uh [dot] edu

CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

Inaugural UH-TMHRI Graduate Scholar Selected

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

By: 

Esmeralda Fisher
Kevin Nathan

The first recipient of the joint University of Houston/The Methodist Hospital Research Institute (TMHRI) Graduate Fellowship in Clinical Translation has been selected.

Kevin Nathan (MSEE), a researcher in the UH department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, will work with professor Jose Contreras-Vidal of UH and Robert Grossman, M.D. of TMHRI on a project titled A Noninvasive Brain-Machine Interface to a Lower-Body Robotic Exoskeleton for Restoration of Gait.

This unique fellowship is designed for Ph.D. students who want to pursue a degree in engineering and biomedical research. The awardees of this fellowship will be enrolled in any Ph.D. program in the Cullen College of Engineering and will be co-mentored by a UH and TMHRI faculty member. The student will have opportunities to work in UH and TMHRI laboratories for the duration of their co-mentored project.

Faculty: 

Department: 

Related News Stories

PHOTOS: John Rogers Shares the Future of Soft Electronics for the Human Body at Engineering Rockwell Lecture

Imagine an electronic “tattoo” on your skin that could continuously monitor your health, or tiny, biocompatible sensors that could treat a traumatic brain injury at the site. It may seem like science fiction, or at least a dream of a very distant future – but as John Rogers of Northwestern University explained to the UH community last week, these are both current examples of biocompatible devices that can integrate with the human body.

MRI-Powered Mini-Robots Could Offer Targeted Treatment

Invasive surgical techniques – cutting through the breastbone for open heart surgery or making a large incision to inspect an abdominal tumor – allow physicians to effectively treat disease but can lead to sometimes serious complications and dramatically slow healing for the patient.

Upcoming Events / Seminars