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Photos: Inside ECE Professor Yan Yao's Laboratory

By: 

Audrey Grayson

Yan Yao, an assistant professor in the electrical and computer engineering department, may be one of the newest additions to the faculty at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, but that hasn't stopped him from making waves across campus with his cutting-edge research.

In the year since Yao has joined the ECE department at the Cullen College of Engineering, he has been awarded the Robert A. Welch Professorship by UH’s Texas Center for Superconductivity (TcSUH), the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award from the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and the 2013 Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award.

And Yao isn't stopping there: the award-winning researcher recently established his very own "Laboratory of Energy Materials and Devices," a 1,000 sq. ft. lab space devoted to research on the materials and devices for energy storage and conversion. The lab space is compartmentalized into a materials synthesis (inorganic and organic) lab and a device/system characterization lab, all conforming to the highest safety standards.

Yao invited us into his brand new laboratory for a tour of the facilities and an introduction to his wonderful group of student researchers and workers. Please click here to view the photos!

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