General Information

Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
Map & Driving Directions (includes parking information)
Email: info [at] egr [dot] uh [dot] edu

CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

PHOTOS: Inside ECE Professor Ji Chen's Research Lab

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

By: 

Audrey Grayson

Ji Chen, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering (ECE) with the UH Cullen College of Engineering, is a leading researcher in the field of electromagnetic compatibility. Today, we are taking a peek inside one of Chen’s labs which is devoted to compatibility testing with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines and implantable medical devices, such as pacemakers.

Since the radio frequency (RF) energy from MRI machines can significantly increase in temperature near metallic implants, individuals with medical devices with metal components are unable to undergo these scans. Chen has developed a formula that describes this heating process in depth and has proposed a filter that could literally block medical devices from electromagnetic waves.

Today, Chen and ECE graduate students Kevin Feng and Qingyan Wang are giving us a demonstration of the daily work they do inside of this lab. Chen and his students place a metallic implantable medical device inside of a phantom, or an object used to test the performance of an MRI machine (in this case, a large clear tub of liquid). The phantom containing the metal implantable device is placed inside of the MRI machine, at which point the team will begin to induce voltage. By running this simulation on different kinds of implantable medical devices, Chen and his students are identifying the highest induced voltage each device can safely withstand, as well as examining the heating effect on the device.

View the full set of photos on our Flickr page!

Faculty: 

Department: 

Centers/Programs: 

Tag: 

Related News Stories

PHOTOS: John Rogers Shares the Future of Soft Electronics for the Human Body at Engineering Rockwell Lecture

Imagine an electronic “tattoo” on your skin that could continuously monitor your health, or tiny, biocompatible sensors that could treat a traumatic brain injury at the site. It may seem like science fiction, or at least a dream of a very distant future – but as John Rogers of Northwestern University explained to the UH community last week, these are both current examples of biocompatible devices that can integrate with the human body.

MRI-Powered Mini-Robots Could Offer Targeted Treatment

Invasive surgical techniques – cutting through the breastbone for open heart surgery or making a large incision to inspect an abdominal tumor – allow physicians to effectively treat disease but can lead to sometimes serious complications and dramatically slow healing for the patient.

Upcoming Events / Seminars