General Information

Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
Map & Driving Directions (includes parking information)
Email: info [at] egr [dot] uh [dot] edu

CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

Rogers To Serve on Two Engineering History Committees

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

By: 

Toby Weber
Rogers
Rogers

Jerry Rogers, associate professor of civil engineering with the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering, has been named to two national-level engineering history committees.

For the American Society of Civil Engineers’ (ASCE) Annual National Conference in Panama City, Panama in 2014, Rogers will sit on the History and Heritage Committee’s (HHC) Subcommittee on the Panama Canal Centennial History (1914-2014).

Rogers will also serve on the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) 50th Anniversary Committee to plan the anniversary activities for the AWRA Conference in Washington, D.C., set for November 2014.

Rogers has long been active in engineering history initiatives. He is a corresponding member and past chairman of the ASCE’s HHC and received the 2011 ASCE National History and Heritage Award and Honorarium. He was also National President of AWRA during the group’s 25th Annual Conference in Tampa, Fla., in 1989.

Faculty: 

Department: 

Related News Stories

$3 Million DOE Project to Evaluate Safety of Transporting Used Nuclear Fuel, Develop Methods to Monitor Fuel Stability During Transit

Kaspar Willam of the Cullen College of Engineering will lead an effort to develop monitoring techniques to ensure nuclear materials remain stable during transit under both normal conditions and in case of an accident.

With more than 74,000 metric tons of used nuclear fuel stored at locations around the United States, ensuring the safety of moving it to more secure disposal sites is a top federal priority.

A University of Houston engineer will lead a $3 million, multi-institution effort to develop monitoring techniques to ensure the nuclear materials remain stable during transit under both normal conditions and in case of an accident.

PHOTOS: H. David Hibbitt Rockwell Lecture

Computer simulation software allows engineers to predict how certain materials will perform under specific – and often extreme – conditions. For instance, major advances in aerospace and flight were made possible due to engineering simulation based on computational solid mechanics, leading to pioneering work conducted by the company Boeing.