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Cullen College of Engineering
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CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

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UH Hosts Dedication Ceremony for Petroleum Engineering Building

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UH Hosts Dedication Ceremony for Petroleum Engineering Building
UH Hosts Dedication Ceremony for Petroleum Engineering Building

University of Houston President Renu Khator will welcome energy industry leaders and others to a June 29 dedication ceremony for the new home of the university’s nascent petroleum engineering program. The petroleum engineering program, which debuted an undergraduate degree program in fall 2009, relocated to Building 9A in the UH Energy Research Park (ERP) this spring semester. The renovated building houses several teaching laboratories, classrooms and offices. The popular bachelor’s degree option already has grown to an estimated 100 students, with the first graduates planned for spring 2013.

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