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UH Civil Engineering Students Paint for Community Service

Four University of Houston civil engineering students recently participated in a Paint-a-Thon Community Service Project during the National Student Conference of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

On June 22, UH students Tene Kuo, Michelle Gonzalez, Justin Edwards and Suneeth Waas joined roughly 40 other civil engineering students across the country to help scrape, prime and paint the home of John Vasen, a 62 year old repairman in Madison, WI.

"Many of us thought of this conference as a mini-break from school and work and it was great to know that we could help someone out in the process," says UH student Tene Kuo.

A week before the project, the village's attorney gave Vasen a limited time frame to have his house painted or he would start receiving fines.

"John is very proud of his lawn and the interior of the house, but is a little shameful of the exterior," says Karen Croysdale, student organizer of the community service project.

At a young age Vasen lost his right hand in a farming accident and in recent years he has overcome two strokes. He still carries a lot of pride and is grateful that the students helped him with the house.

The conference, which celebrated the 150th Anniversary of ASCE, was held June 21-24 in Madison, WI. ASCE is the oldest national engineering society in the United States.

UH civil engineering students Michelle Gonzalez, Justin Edwards, Tene Kuo and Suneeth Waas at the ASCE National Awards Dinner.

A special thanks to Cobb, Fendley & Associates, PTI, Mike Lacy, UH ASCE chapter and others for sponsoring the UH students on this educational trip.

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