CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Dr. Yu, Cunjiang

Researchers Report Advances in Stretchable Rubbery Semiconductors, Rubbery Integrated Electronics

Researchers from the University of Houston have reported significant advances in stretchable electronics, moving the field closer to commercialization.

Researchers from the University of Houston have reported significant advances in stretchable electronics, moving the field closer to commercialization.

In a paper published Friday, Feb. 1, in Science Advances, they outlined advances in creating stretchable rubbery semiconductors, including rubbery integrated electronics, logic circuits and arrayed sensory skins fully based on rubber materials.

Wearable Human Machine Interface Device Wins Big at 2018 Materials Today Conference

Kyoseung Sim, a Cullen College of Engineering alumnus, with his award winning poster.

Materials Science Postdoc Takes Home Top Poster Prize

 

A postdoctoral researcher working on soft functional electronic human machine interfacing (HMI) devices with the Yu Research Group at the University of Houston won first place for the best poster award at the 2018 “Materials Today: The Future of Materials Science in the Next Two Decades” conference. It was sponsored by the Materials Today journal and Rice University.

Researchers Design ‘Soft’ Robots that Can Move on Their Own

Robots Could be Used in Medicine, Rescue and Defense

 

If Star Wars’ R2-D2 is your idea of a robot, think again. Researchers led by a University of Houston engineer have reported a new class of soft robot, composed of ultrathin sensing, actuating electronics and temperature-sensitive artificial muscle that can adapt to the environment and crawl, similar to the movement of an inchworm or caterpillar.

Artificial ‘Skin’ Gives Robotic Hand a Sense of Touch

UH Researchers Discover New Form of Stretchable Electronics, Sensors and Skins

A team of researchers from the University of Houston has reported a breakthrough in stretchable electronics that can serve as an artificial skin, allowing a robotic hand to sense the difference between hot and cold, while also offering advantages for a wide range of biomedical devices.

Breakthrough in Dissolving Electronics Holds Promise for Biomedicine

Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering, center, and co-first authors Xu Wang, left, and Kyoseung Sim, right)

Discovery Has Applications for Eco-Friendly Disposal, Data Security and Healthcare

Researchers from the University of Houston and China have reported a new type of electronic device that can be triggered to dissolve through exposure to water molecules in the atmosphere.

Researchers Draw Inspiration for Camouflage System From Marine Life

Cuttlefish

It could be a fun party trick – put your cell phone down on a table and watch it fade into the woodwork – or part of a lifesaving technology used by industry or the military.

Researchers have developed a technology that allows a material to automatically read its environment and adapt to mimic its surroundings. The technology is described in a paper published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.