CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

Dr. Contreras-Vidal, Jose Luis

Nature Magazine Features UH Professor’s Work to Address Paralysis

Nature features University of Houston Professor Jose Contreras-Vidal, known for his work to improve prostheses using brain-machine interfaces.

About 3.5 million people in America are living with some degree of paralysis related to stroke, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy. Nature magazine this month published an article about scientists developing technological solutions, such as neural prostheses or devices that read brain signals and help restore movement in paralyzed patients.

Use of Brain-Computer Interface & Virtual Avatar Offers New Hope to Patients with Gait Disabilities

Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal, Cullen College professor of electrical and computer engineering

Researchers Demonstrate Non-Invasive Method Can Help People Re-Learn to Walk

Researchers from the University of Houston have shown for the first time that the use of a brain-computer interface augmented with a virtual walking avatar can control gait, suggesting the protocol may help patients recover the ability to walk after stroke, some spinal cord injuries and certain other gait disabilities.

‘Your Brain on Art’ Musical Performance Set at UH

How does music affect our brains? The latest in a series of collaborations designed to learn what happens in the brain as people create, perform and contemplate art will take place at noon Tuesday, March 1, at the University of Houston’s student center.

Saxophonists Woody Witt and Dan Gelok, both faculty members at the UH Moores School of Music, and drummer Guillermo “Memo” Reza will perform while researchers record their brain activity.

UH Engineer Seeks Connection Between Art and Science

As part of a growing scientific emphasis on understanding the brain, a UH engineering professor is studying what happens as people create and contemplate art and beauty.

Jose Luis Contreras-Vidal has received a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to track neural activity as people both make and view art.

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