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Photos: Spring 2020 Rockwell Lecture Series Presents “Liquid Nanofabrication of Functional Multiphasic Soft Matter by Capillary Binding and Interfacial Templating”

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Inez Hutchinson
The spring 2020 Distinguished Rockwell Lecture Series on Friday, January 24 featuring a lecture by Dr. Orlin Velev.

UH Engineering kicked off the spring 2020 Distinguished Rockwell Lecture Series on Friday, January 24 featuring a lecture by Dr. Orlin Velev.

Orlin Velev is a S. Frank and Doris Culberson Distinguished Professor in the chemical and biomolecular engineering department at North Carolina State University. He is best known for his work on soft matter, colloid science and nanoscience.

Velev’s talk, “Liquid Nanofabrication of Functional Multiphasic Soft Matter by Capillary Binding and Interfacial Templating,” focused on his latest research on two new engineering strategies that use multiphasic liquid-liquid-polymer systems to make a rich variety of novel colloidal structures and materials.

The Rockwell Distinguished Lecture Series is named for Elizabeth Dennis Rockwell, a UH alumnae, industry expert and philanthropist who passed away in 2011.

Click here to view the lecturer schedule for the 2020 Rockwell Lecture Series.

Click here to view photos from Velev’s Rockwell Lecture!

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