CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

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Biomedical Engineering Leaders Converge on UH for 5th Annual "BME Day"

Leaders and pioneers in the biomedical engineering (BME) field gathered at the University of Houston this April for the 5th Annual "BME Day," hosted by the UH Cullen College's biomedical engineering department.

The event, which took place April 27 at the UH Health and Biomedical Sciences Center, drew renowned speakers from academia and industry, including Dr. Ann Tanabe (CEO of BioHouston), Dr. Celese Fralick (Chief Data Scientist at McAfee), and keynote speakers, Dr. Ted Berger (David Packer Professor of Engineering at University of Southern California) and Dr. Colin Brenan (Founder and CCO of HiFiBio).

"BME Day" also provided senior BME undergraduate students the opportunity to present the results of their Capstone projects and network with industry professionals, current faculty, and BME graduate students.

Metin Akay, founding chair of the UH biomedical engineering department, said the purpose of "BME Day" is to "support, promote and strengthen the biomedical and healthcare engineering research and educational programs at UH and across the state of Texas."

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