General Information

Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
Map & Driving Directions (includes parking information)
Email: info [at] egr [dot] uh [dot] edu

CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

Subsea Engineering’s “Passport to UH” is a Passport to Fun for Young Students

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

By: 

Laurie Fickman
Sparking young minds at Passport to UH events
Sparking young minds at Passport to UH events
Catapult launch and learn
Catapult launch and learn

Engineering may not be elementary, but elementary-aged students can still enjoy engineering. And they did, en masse, during two Passport to UH events hosted by the Cullen College’s subsea engineering program.

On Jan. 20, baby engineers from Lamar ISD 5th grade classes gathered at UH during Subsea STEM Day, which encourages young students to become involved in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields.

Subsea engineering alumni joined industry leaders from GE Oil & Gas, FMC, NOV and Baker Hughes as judges and mentors for the event

On Feb. 3, subsea engineering hosted Memorial Elementary School’s 4th grade with 65 students.

They also toured the UH campus, hitting highlights including the University Center (UC), MD Anderson Library and TDECU Stadium. Then they got down to business as their catapults were presented to judges from notable engineering companies Baker Hughes and NOV along with subsea engineering alumni from the Cullen College.

The Passport to UH program is led by Matthew Franchek, founding director of the subsea engineering program and mechanical engineering professor.

For a look at the days of engineering fun and learning, click here.

Faculty: 

Department: 

Related News Stories

Yashashree Kulkarni receives ASME 2017 Sia Nemat-Nasser Early Career Award

Yashashree Kulkarni is all about twins

When Yashashree Kulkarni isn’t singing opera (her latest pursuit), the associate professor of mechanical engineering is singing the praises of twinning, the process by which interfaces known as twin boundaries are introduced in metals to make them stronger. Twin boundaries are created when layers of atoms in crystalline materials are arranged in pairs of mirror images (twins) stacked on top of one another.

Upcoming Events / Seminars