General Information

Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
Map & Driving Directions (includes parking information)
Email: info [at] egr [dot] uh [dot] edu

CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

Doctoral Student Wins Fellowship to Investigate Applied Superconductivity

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

By: 

Natalie Thayer

Meysam Heydari Gharahcheshmeh, a materials engineering doctoral student at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, received a 2016 Graduate Study Fellowship in Applied Superconductivity from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

The annual fellowship is awarded by the IEEE’s Council on Superconductivity Committee (CSC) to encourage promising doctoral students studying applied superconductivity to contribute to the future of the field. Applicants are selected based on the quality of prior work, the impact of their current research and the potential impact of their future research. Applicants’ financial need is also taken into consideration.

At the Cullen College, Heydari Gharahcheshmeh works with his award-winning advisor and mentor Venkat Selvamanickam, M.D. Anderson Chair Professor of mechanical engineering and director of the Texas Center for Superconductivity Applied Research Hub. Selvamanickam is also the founder of the Advanced Superconductor Manufacturing Institute, an industry-led consortium.

Heydari Gharahcheshmeh said that it has been “an honor and a deeply enriching experience to work so closely with Dr. Selvamanickam.”

As a 2016 recipient, Heydari Gharahcheshmeh received complimentary membership to the IEEE and a CSC’s sponsoring societies, an inscribed certificate and a $5,000 honorarium.

Learn more about the IEEE’s Graduate Study Fellowship in Applied Superconductivity at http://ieeecsc.org/awards/ieee-csc-fellowship-award.

 

Faculty: 

Department: 

Related News Stories

Artificial ‘Skin’ Gives Robotic Hand a Sense of Touch

UH Researchers Discover New Form of Stretchable Electronics, Sensors and Skins

A team of researchers from the University of Houston has reported a breakthrough in stretchable electronics that can serve as an artificial skin, allowing a robotic hand to sense the difference between hot and cold, while also offering advantages for a wide range of biomedical devices.

Breakthrough in Dissolving Electronics Holds Promise for Biomedicine

Cunjiang Yu, Bill D. Cook Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering, center, and co-first authors Xu Wang, left, and Kyoseung Sim, right)

Discovery Has Applications for Eco-Friendly Disposal, Data Security and Healthcare

Researchers from the University of Houston and China have reported a new type of electronic device that can be triggered to dissolve through exposure to water molecules in the atmosphere.

Upcoming Events / Seminars