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Chemical Doctoral Student Wins AIChE Research Award

By: 

Natalie Thayer

Katy Olafson, a chemical engineering doctoral student at the UH Cullen of Engineering, received a 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineering (AIChE) Separations Division Graduate Student Research Award.

Working with her faculty advisors John and Rebecca Moores Professor Peter Vekilov and Ernest J. and Barbara M. Henley Associate Professor Jeffrey Rimer, Olafson’s research focuses on malaria pathophysiology from the aspect of hematin crystallization. Specifically, Olafson studies how anti-malarial drugs affect crystallization in an effort to contribute to the development of new drugs to treat the disease. 

Rimer, a leading researcher in the field of crystallization, said Olafson’s dedication to the work makes her stand apart from the crowd.

“Katy is not only a promising researcher, but a rising star in her field,” said Rimer.

The award will be presented to Olafson at the 2016 AIChE Annual Meeting in San Francisco, California. In addition to attending the meeting as the Separations Division’s guest, she will receive a $200 cash prize and a plaque inscribed with her name.

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