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Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. Earns Travel Grant for Chicago Conference

By: 

Melanie Ziems
Yun Peng, Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. Student
Yun Peng, Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. Student

A Cullen College of Engineering Ph.D. student has earned travel funds to explain his studies on female stress urinary incontinence this spring in Chicago.

Yun Peng, who is studying biomedical engineering, received a travel award to attend the Simon Foundation for Continence’s Innovating for Continence Conference and present his research. His research combines pelvic floor muscle EMG acquisition tools with computational modeling, providing a novel approach for investigating the stress urinary incontinence. Peng said his research aligns well with the conference’s calling for “increased development of creative and efficacious products for the management of incontinence.”

Peng said his invitation to attend is particularly meaningful because of the networking opportunities. “This international conference invites people from all over the world who are passionate in incontinence management,” he said. “As a biomedical engineer, I view using my engineering skills to serve the incontinence patients as my ultimate goal. So it is very important for me to hear the voices from and exchange ideas with incontinence patients, clinical practitioners, academia and industry. It will also provide me with a great opportunity to bring my ideas from the engineering side to the conference and receive constructive feedbacks to sharpen my future researches.”

Peng will attend the conference in Chicago in mid-April.

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