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American Society of Indian Engineers Recognizes Cullen College Students with Scholarships

By: 

Melanie Ziems
Gahlawat, right, with White at the ASIE banquet.
Gahlawat, right, with White at the ASIE banquet.

This fall, the American Society of Indian Engineers (ASIE) took notice of several Cullen College of Engineering students and awarded their academic excellence with scholarships ranging from $1,000 to $5,000.

Mechanical engineering students Sonika Gahlawat, Abhilash Reddy and Himani Agrawal were just a few of the students honored by the ASIE at their banquet in November. Ken White, professor of mechanical engineering, also attended.

Gahlawat said her scholarship of $1,500 was the fourth scholarship she received this fall. White is her advisor. She said the scholarships are helpful financially because, due to visa limitations for international students, they often are unable to work off-campus. She said her scholarship would cover her semester fees.

Reddy’s advisor is Hadi Ghasemi, assistant professor of mechanical engineering. Ghasemi said only 11 students in the Houston area are awarded an ASIE scholarship annually. Reddy and Ghasemi are currently working on development of a new platform for remote actuation of fluid flow with laser.

To learn more about the ASIE, click here.

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