CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

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Cullen College Equips Students for Growing Industry Needs, Chronicle Says

By: 

Melanie Ziems
"About five or six years ago, industry leaders came to us and said they needed petroleum engineers, and we are continuing to tailor our programs to meet the industry's needs," Shattuck said.
"About five or six years ago, industry leaders came to us and said they needed petroleum engineers, and we are continuing to tailor our programs to meet the industry's needs," Shattuck said.

The International Energy Agency predicts the demand for energy and corresponding expertise for the exploration and production industries will grow by one-third over the next 20 years. Faced with that looming increase, industry leaders are looking at how best to bulk up their workforce with trained and experienced engineers.

According to a new article in the Houston Chronicle, E&P leaders are particularly looking for new talent in areas like subsea and petroleum engineering. The article states that “a strong and immediate need for oil field-related skilled- and unskilled workers developed as the activities in and around the various shale plays have erupted.” Because of shale play involvement, geologists and geophysicists are also playing a significant role in the exploration process.

Always prepared, the Cullen College of Engineering is equipped with booming petroleum and subsea engineering programs. David Shattuck, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering and dean of undergraduate resources at the college, told the Chronicle they received a personal heads up from major players in the E&P industry: "About five or six years ago, industry leaders came to us and said they needed petroleum engineers, and we are continuing to tailor our programs to meet the industry's needs."

Read the full Houston Chronicle article here.

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