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Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
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University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering


PHOTOS: ECE Alumni Mixer

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Audrey Grayson

The UH Cullen College of Engineering’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering held their alumni mixer last night at Saint Arnold’s Brewing Company in Houston. The alumni event was held in honor of professors emeriti Betty Barr and Ovidiu Crisan.

The ECE alumni mixer invitations had barely gone out to alumni of the department before the RSVP’s began flooding in. Being the first alumni mixer the ECE department has had in decades, the event was full within a week of the invitations being sent out.

At this year’s alumni mixer, guests enjoyed free food, beer and raffle prizes. The chair of the ECE department, Badri Roysam, along with Elizabeth D. Rockwell Endowed Chair and Dean of the Cullen College Joseph W. Tedesco, were both in attendance at the event.

If you missed this year’s ECE alumni mixer, please visit the ECE department’s calendar to stay up-to-date on upcoming events:

To view photos from the ECE alumni mixer, please visit our Flickr page:




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