General Information

Mail: University of Houston
Cullen College of Engineering
E421 Engineering Bldg 2, 4722 Calhoun Rd, Houston, TX 77204-4007
Map & Driving Directions (includes parking information)
Email: info [at] egr [dot] uh [dot] edu

CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

PHOTOS: ECE Alumni Mixer

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

By: 

Audrey Grayson

The UH Cullen College of Engineering’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering held their alumni mixer last night at Saint Arnold’s Brewing Company in Houston. The alumni event was held in honor of professors emeriti Betty Barr and Ovidiu Crisan.

The ECE alumni mixer invitations had barely gone out to alumni of the department before the RSVP’s began flooding in. Being the first alumni mixer the ECE department has had in decades, the event was full within a week of the invitations being sent out.

At this year’s alumni mixer, guests enjoyed free food, beer and raffle prizes. The chair of the ECE department, Badri Roysam, along with Elizabeth D. Rockwell Endowed Chair and Dean of the Cullen College Joseph W. Tedesco, were both in attendance at the event.

If you missed this year’s ECE alumni mixer, please visit the ECE department’s calendar to stay up-to-date on upcoming events: http://www.ee.uh.edu/calendar.

To view photos from the ECE alumni mixer, please visit our Flickr page: http://flic.kr/s/aHsjMQ6cmU.

Faculty: 

Department: 

Centers/Programs: 

Related News Stories

Rotating and Aligning Graphene Flakes – A UH Engineer's Discovery Opens Doors to Progress

Associate Professor Jiming Bao and screen filled with graphene flakes suspended in solvent between two layers of glass. Bao discovered that a magnet rotates and aligns the flakes.

In 2010 graphene took center stage when the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to two scientists in the UK "for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene." At the UH Cullen College of Engineering, that same passion over pencil lead is shared by Jiming Bao, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, but he’s taken it to a whole new dimension,

PHOTOS: H. David Hibbitt Rockwell Lecture

Computer simulation software allows engineers to predict how certain materials will perform under specific – and often extreme – conditions. For instance, major advances in aerospace and flight were made possible due to engineering simulation based on computational solid mechanics, leading to pioneering work conducted by the company Boeing.