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BME Faculty Meet with Turkish Health Minister

By: 

Toby Weber
Members of the College's biomedical engineering department met with Turkish government officials at a recent gathering in Houston.
Members of the College's biomedical engineering department met with Turkish government officials at a recent gathering in Houston.

Members of the biomedical engineering department at the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering met with Turkey’s Minister of Health during his recent visit to Houston.

Mehmet Muezzinoglu came to the city earlier this month to meet with members of the area’s Turkish community, discuss plans for the future of his country’s healthcare services, and introduce the Turkish medical system to U.S. healthcare investors.

Associate Professor Ahmet Omurtag, Assistant Professor Nuri Ince and Academic Advisor Allyson Plosko attended the gathering, which was held at the home of the Turkish Houston General Consul, Cemalettin Aydın. During the reception, the group discussed UH’s biomedical engineering department and the research being conducted by its faculty.

 “We had a friendly discussion and the minister said there were a lot of things that Turkey needed and that our research was very relevant. We agreed to continue the conversation. He invited us to come and see him whenever we were in Ankara,” said Omurtag.

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