News

BME Faculty Meet with Turkish Health Minister

By: 

Toby Weber
Members of the College's biomedical engineering department met with Turkish government officials at a recent gathering in Houston.
Members of the College's biomedical engineering department met with Turkish government officials at a recent gathering in Houston.

Members of the biomedical engineering department at the University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering met with Turkey’s Minister of Health during his recent visit to Houston.

Mehmet Muezzinoglu came to the city earlier this month to meet with members of the area’s Turkish community, discuss plans for the future of his country’s healthcare services, and introduce the Turkish medical system to U.S. healthcare investors.

Associate Professor Ahmet Omurtag, Assistant Professor Nuri Ince and Academic Advisor Allyson Plosko attended the gathering, which was held at the home of the Turkish Houston General Consul, Cemalettin Aydın. During the reception, the group discussed UH’s biomedical engineering department and the research being conducted by its faculty.

 “We had a friendly discussion and the minister said there were a lot of things that Turkey needed and that our research was very relevant. We agreed to continue the conversation. He invited us to come and see him whenever we were in Ankara,” said Omurtag.

Faculty: 

Department/Academic Programs: 

Related News Stories

UH, HCC partnering on Engineering Academy at Fraga campus

An exterior shot of the flags flying at the Houston Community College's Fraga Campus. The University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering and HCC will be partnering to create an Engineering Academy on the campus.

The University of Houston's Cullen College of Engineering and Houston Community College have reached an agreement to offer UH Engineering Academy courses at the HCC Felix Fraga Academic Campus on the east side of Houston on Navigation Boulevard.

Screening for Skin Disease on Your Laptop

Dr. Yasemin Akay

The founding chair of the Biomedical Engineering Department at the University of Houston is reporting a new deep neural network architecture that provides early diagnosis of systemic sclerosis (SSc), a rare autoimmune disease marked by hardened or fibrous skin and internal organs. The proposed network, implemented using a standard laptop computer (2.5 GHz Intel Core i7), can immediately differentiate between images of healthy skin and skin with systemic sclerosis.