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University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

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Video: Q&A With Dr. Bonnie Dunbar

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Audrey Grayson
Dunbar
Dunbar

The University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering is proud to present our Q&A session with Dr. Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., NAE. This video serves as a special supplement to the print version of our Q&A session with Dr. Dunbar, which can be found in our Spring 2013 issue of Parameters.

Dunbar is a retired astronaut, National Academy of Engineering Member and alumna of the Cullen College of Engineering. She now returns to UH to serve as the leader of the University of Houston STEM Center as well as professor in the college's mechanical and biomedical engineering departments.

To learn more about the UH STEM Center, please visit:
https://www.facebook.com/UHSTEM
https://twitter.com/UH_STEM_Center

 

Visit the Cullen College of Engineering's YouTube.

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