CULLEN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

University of Houston Cullen College of Engineering

News

UH Creates New Energy & Sustainability Minor

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

By: 

Audrey Grayson

The University of Houston -- and particularly the Cullen College of Engineering -- have taken bold and progressive steps in partnering with local industry and taking advantage of the university's location in the "Energy Capital of the World." Now, the University of Houston Bauer College of Business will follow suit by offering a new interdisciplinary Energy & Sustainability Minor designed for students who are pursuing a wide range of majors and are looking to understand the key issues in the world of energy.

The new minor is part of UH’s strategic plan to enhance and expand its energy-related educational and research initiatives as it seeks to become “the energy university,” said Dow Chair Professor Ramanan Krishnamoorti, special assistant to the president/chancellor for UH Energy.

The university will begin offering the Energy & Sustainability minor this fall, and the courses will be taught by faculty members from different colleges across campus. Dr. Shankar Chellam, professor of civil and environmental engineering in the Cullen College, will be teaching an environmental engineering course which falls under the new Energy & Sustainability minor.

“This new minor can be taken by students majoring in business, engineering, technology, natural sciences and math, even public policy – anyone who is interested in pursuing a career in the energy industry,” Krishnamoorti said. “It will make UH students more relevant to the energy industry and more aware of the issues that will be important to them for the rest of their careers.”

The minor consists of 18 hours of courses, including the required course "Introduction to Energy & Sustainability," which will be offered this fall, and "Case Studies in Energy & Sustainability," which will be offered in the spring of 2014. The remaining 12 hours of courses can be elected by the student.

The purpose of the minor is to introduce students to the history of energy production and use as well as climate change and its impact on energy use. In addition, students will be tasked with understanding emerging energy sources, analyzing energy consumption patterns with environmental issues, becoming more competitive in the energy and sustainability job markets, and integrating energy's role with global economic, social and political issues.

“This minor gives students a quick start to thinking in broad terms about the different issues affecting the world of energy, such as sustainability and policy,” Krishnamoorti said. “Through these courses, we are giving them the tools they need to think about the energy industry in a holistic way. They will be better-educated graduates for the industry overall.”

Faculty: 

Department: 

Related News Stories

UH Alumnus Appointed Chair of Engineering Department of Turkish University

Hasan Onur Keles, a UH BME alumnus, appointed chair of the electrical and electronic engineering department at Istinye University in Istanbul.

An engineering connection spanning continents and countries

 

Cullen College of Engineering alumnus Hasan Onur Keles (BME 2015) was recently appointed chair of the electrical and electronic engineering department at Istinye University in Istanbul. He also serves as an assistant professor in the department.

UH Student’s Poster Places at Neuromodulation Symposium

Musa Ozturk, a UH graduate student, stands in front of the award-winning poster with Jianping Wu, senior principal scientist at Medtronic and co-author of the study.

Research proposes computer-based assessment of Parkinson’s patients more reliable

 

Musa Ozturk, a Ph.D. student in biomedical engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering, presented a poster at the Neuromodulation Symposium at the University of Minnesota and won second place out of 120 presentations.

Mission: Possible — Mapping Dangerous Terrain

UH researchers are testing prototypes for the project in Brays Bayou.

UH Engineers Focus on Degradable Reconnaissance Vehicles and Evasive Drone Maneuvers

 

Ensuring military forces have up-to-date information about a potentially hostile region offers obvious advantages, but current methods for doing that – especially along shorelines, where underwater mines and other hazards can pose serious risks – all have drawbacks. It is especially difficult if keeping the technology out of enemy hands is a priority.

Upcoming Events / Seminars